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Thought Leaders

Thought Leaders

Ted Scott

Ted Scott

Secretariat International1600 Rosecrans AveMedia Center, Fourth FloorEl SegundoUSA90266

Thought Leader

WWL Ranking: Global Elite Thought Leader

WWL says

Ted Scott is commended for his “thorough and skilled analysis” and his “deep knowledge of construction practice and procedure”.

Questions & Answers

Mr Scott is a managing director of Secretariat International and oversees the West Coast practice in the United States. He is a licensed civil engineer, specialising in dispute resolution, delay and disruption analyses, cost overruns, scheduling, and project controls. Mr Scott has been appointed as an expert on numerous disputes in Asia, Australia, Europe, North America and the Middle East. He has testified in US federal and state courts and in arbitrations (under ICC, AAA and JAMS rules) as an independent expert on matters of scheduling, project delay, loss of productivity and quantum.

What has been your most interesting construction case to date, and why?

This is a difficult question as I find every project interesting, since each one is unique in some way. That said, I am currently working on a project that will literally save lives. It is a suicide-deterrent system that is being installed on a bridge where over 1,600 people have sadly taken their lives. Most projects incur some sort of financial damage if they are not completed on time but you can’t put a value high enough on this one.

What did you find most difficult about entering practice as a construction expert?

To be a good expert requires the combination of a number of skills. On top of being technically experienced enough to carry out the analysis, you then have to master communication skills in order to articulate the analysis in a concise and persuasive way (in both written and oral form). Then, and perhaps the most difficult skill to hone, is being able to think on your feet such that you can handle cross-examination.

However, even if you have all of these skills, there can be factors outside of your control. Like maybe you are perceived to be too young – ie, you do not have enough “grey hair”. That is what I found the most difficult thing about entering the practice. It is one thing to be confident in yourself that you are the best person for a matter, it is another to be able to convince others.

What do you enjoy most about your current role?

I have always really loved the work that I do. Since the beginning of Secretariat, we’ve been able to work on some of the world’s most fascinating projects and I truly enjoy each one’s unique challenges. I’ve also been fortunate to work with some great clients and lawyers, many of which I now consider friends.

Which technologies are playing the most prominent role in construction practice, and how are they enhancing day-to-day tasks?

Quite a few of the recent projects that I have worked on have used drones to capture progress, be it with photographs or videos. Not only can you see exactly what was happening anywhere on a project, but you can also know exactly what time of day it occurred. It has added a greater level of detail to as-built programmes and can also be very convincing as a demonstrative tool in trial.

I’m also just starting to see automation being employed on construction products, in terms of both labour and equipment. It will be very interesting to see how this impacts productivity in the future.

You have raised labour productivity as a consistent issue in construction disputes lately. What challenges do these matters present for construction experts?

Proving loss of efficiency claims remains very challenging. It can be absolutely clear to everyone on the site that the works are not progressing as efficiently as they should. However, tying the inefficiency to a specific event (or events) and quantifying that loss can be difficult. It requires a level of detailed record-keeping that, in the past, most contractors (and particularly subcontractors) don’t have the time or budget to perform. However, technology now exists where contractors (and employers) are able to capture progress around the clock at lower costs. When you can visually demonstrate crews having to work out of sequence or mobilise in and out of areas, it can be a powerful tool in establishing causation and entitlement.

How does Secretariat International distinguish itself from the competition?

We have always prided ourselves on our culture and it is something that we strive to maintain, even while growing. To that end, we try to find the “right” people who we think are going to fit instead of just growing for growth’s sake. As a result, you get a team of people who really like what they do, work hard, and take pride in what they are doing. I think it is why we enjoy such a high repeat engagement rate.

You have enjoyed a very distinguished career so far. What would you like to achieve that you have not yet accomplished?

I think at some point, I would like to sit on an arbitral tribunal.

WWL Ranking: Thought Leader

WWL says

Ted Scott is commended for his “thorough and skilled analysis” and his “deep knowledge of construction practice and procedure”.

Questions & Answers

Mr Scott is a managing director of Secretariat International and oversees the West Coast practice in the United States. He is a licensed civil engineer, specialising in dispute resolution, delay and disruption analyses, cost overruns, scheduling, and project controls. Mr Scott has been appointed as an expert on numerous disputes in Asia, Australia, Europe, North America and the Middle East. He has testified in US federal and state courts and in arbitrations (under ICC, AAA and JAMS rules) as an independent expert on matters of scheduling, project delay, loss of productivity and quantum.

What has been your most interesting construction case to date, and why?

This is a difficult question as I find every project interesting, since each one is unique in some way. That said, I am currently working on a project that will literally save lives. It is a suicide-deterrent system that is being installed on a bridge where over 1,600 people have sadly taken their lives. Most projects incur some sort of financial damage if they are not completed on time but you can’t put a value high enough on this one.

What did you find most difficult about entering practice as a construction expert?

To be a good expert requires the combination of a number of skills. On top of being technically experienced enough to carry out the analysis, you then have to master communication skills in order to articulate the analysis in a concise and persuasive way (in both written and oral form). Then, and perhaps the most difficult skill to hone, is being able to think on your feet such that you can handle cross-examination.

However, even if you have all of these skills, there can be factors outside of your control. Like maybe you are perceived to be too young – ie, you do not have enough “grey hair”. That is what I found the most difficult thing about entering the practice. It is one thing to be confident in yourself that you are the best person for a matter, it is another to be able to convince others.

What do you enjoy most about your current role?

I have always really loved the work that I do. Since the beginning of Secretariat, we’ve been able to work on some of the world’s most fascinating projects and I truly enjoy each one’s unique challenges. I’ve also been fortunate to work with some great clients and lawyers, many of which I now consider friends.

Which technologies are playing the most prominent role in construction practice, and how are they enhancing day-to-day tasks?

Quite a few of the recent projects that I have worked on have used drones to capture progress, be it with photographs or videos. Not only can you see exactly what was happening anywhere on a project, but you can also know exactly what time of day it occurred. It has added a greater level of detail to as-built programmes and can also be very convincing as a demonstrative tool in trial.

I’m also just starting to see automation being employed on construction products, in terms of both labour and equipment. It will be very interesting to see how this impacts productivity in the future.

You have raised labour productivity as a consistent issue in construction disputes lately. What challenges do these matters present for construction experts?

Proving loss of efficiency claims remains very challenging. It can be absolutely clear to everyone on the site that the works are not progressing as efficiently as they should. However, tying the inefficiency to a specific event (or events) and quantifying that loss can be difficult. It requires a level of detailed record-keeping that, in the past, most contractors (and particularly subcontractors) don’t have the time or budget to perform. However, technology now exists where contractors (and employers) are able to capture progress around the clock at lower costs. When you can visually demonstrate crews having to work out of sequence or mobilise in and out of areas, it can be a powerful tool in establishing causation and entitlement.

How does Secretariat International distinguish itself from the competition?

We have always prided ourselves on our culture and it is something that we strive to maintain, even while growing. To that end, we try to find the “right” people who we think are going to fit instead of just growing for growth’s sake. As a result, you get a team of people who really like what they do, work hard, and take pride in what they are doing. I think it is why we enjoy such a high repeat engagement rate.

You have enjoyed a very distinguished career so far. What would you like to achieve that you have not yet accomplished?

I think at some point, I would like to sit on an arbitral tribunal.

Global Leader

WWL Ranking: Global Elite Thought Leader

WWL says

Ted Scott is commended for his "thorough and skilled analysis" and his "deep knowledge of construction practice and procedure". 

Biography

Mr Scott is a managing director of Secretariat International and manages their West Coast practice in the United States. He is a licensed civil engineer, with over 20 years of experience in the construction industry, specialising in dispute resolution, delay and disruption analyses, cost overruns, scheduling and project controls. His experience spans a variety of large-scale infrastructure and commercial projects including airports, casinos, education, high-rise commercial/residential, highways and bridges, hospitals, hotels, judicial, oil and gas, ports, power, rail, stadiums, tunnels and water/wastewater treatment facilities.

Mr Scott has been appointed as an expert on numerous disputes in Asia, Australia, Europe, North America and the Middle East. He has testified in US federal and state courts and in arbitrations (under ICC, AAA and JAMS rules) as an independent expert on matters of scheduling, project delay, loss of productivity and quantum.

Mr Scott is also an author and frequent speaker on a variety of construction-related topics. He currently serves on the American Society of Civil Engineers’ committee for the development of a national standard for conducting CPM schedule delay analyses in construction.

Prior to working in the consulting field, Mr Scott worked both as a civil engineer and scheduler on several large highway and bridge projects gaining hands-on experience from the ground up.

Mr Scott received both a BS in civil engineering and an MBA from Virginia Tech.

WWL Ranking: Global Elite Thought Leader

WWL says

Ted Scott is a favourite among sources who of whom notes they were “very much impressed with Ted’s work - he should be on anyone’s shortlist for delay analysis without question”.

Biography

Mr Scott is a managing director of Secretariat International and manages their West Coast practice in the United States. He is a licensed civil engineer, with over 20 years of experience in the construction industry, specialising in dispute resolution, delay and disruption analyses, cost overruns, scheduling and project controls. His experience spans a variety of large-scale infrastructure and commercial projects including airports, casinos, education, high-rise commercial/residential, highways and bridges, hospitals, hotels, judicial, oil and gas, ports, power, rail, stadiums, tunnels and water/wastewater treatment facilities.

Mr Scott has been appointed as an expert on numerous disputes in Asia, Australia, Europe, North America and the Middle East. He has testified in US federal and state courts and in arbitrations (under ICC, AAA and JAMS rules) as an independent expert on matters of scheduling, project delay, loss of productivity and quantum.

Mr Scott is also an author and frequent speaker on a variety of construction-related topics. He currently serves on the American Society of Civil Engineers’ committee for the development of a national standard for conducting CPM schedule delay analyses in construction.

Prior to working in the consulting field, Mr Scott worked both as a civil engineer and scheduler on several large highway and bridge projects gaining hands-on experience from the ground up.

Mr Scott received both a BS in civil engineering and an MBA from Virginia Tech.

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