Daniel Preiskel
Office:
4 King’s Bench Walk
Temple
EC4Y 7DL
City:
London
Country:
England
Tel:
+44 20 7332 5656
Fax:
+44 20 7332 5641

Questions and Answers:

Who's Who Legal Thought Leaders - Data

Daniel is a co-founder of Preiskel & Co and has been ranked for around 20 years in the major independent research guides as one of the world’s leading communications lawyers. He is particularly recognised for commercial and regulatory work in the UK and overseas. He has an MA in law from Cambridge University, is FCA authorised and speaks seven languages.

WHAT MOTIVATED YOU TO SPECIALISE IN THE TMT SECTOR?

I always loved travelling and had friends abroad, so it was natural to enjoy working on international commercial and regulatory projects that opened the way for innovative and lower-cost communications. When I started in TMT, the vast majority of countries had one monopoly supplier of telecoms services and long-distance calls were surprisingly expensive. As a lawyer in the telecoms sector, devising innovative regulatory strategies opened up completely new markets for my telecoms clients. This meant leading telecoms lawyers in general played a disproportionately important role in creating new opportunities for their clients, which in turn led to radical falls in international call pricing.

There is also satisfaction from a social responsibility perspective. I have advised governments in various continents on new telecoms regimes that have required telecoms networks to reach poor communities in developing nations that had hitherto not been connected. Various studies have shown that connecting a community or area to a telecoms network produces a major increase in GDP per capita. I would, therefore, like to think that I have helped in some way to make a real difference to various low-income communities across the globe.

WHAT HAS BEEN THE HIGHLIGHT OF YOUR CAREER SO FAR?

It’s hard to pick out a highlight but certainly the most vivid experience was advising the Bolivian president and the country’s Privatisation Committee on a new telecoms regulatory regime and privatisation. As broadcast on CNN, we were attacked in the telecoms ministry with dynamite by some miners who had been incited to violent protest by the extreme left opposition party.  I had the idea to have published the next morning the draft telecoms law in the major newspapers (which carried the summary on the first page and full text on the back outer page) for openness and to portray the underlying message that is it worth endangering life over this? That perhaps diffused some of the tension, though martial law was imposed for the remainder of what proved to be a highly successful privatisation and telecoms regulatory reform to improve the provision of telecoms throughout Bolivia.

HOW HAS THE GENERAL DATA PROTECTION REGULATION (GDPR) IMPACTED YOUR PRACTICE SO FAR AND HOW DO YOU THINK THAT CLIENT’S REQUIREMENTS WILL CHANGE ONCE IT COMES INTO FORCE?

As a TMT lawyer I have been advising on data privacy for years (eg, as part of the Mobile Ecosystem Forum’s Privacy in Mobile Applications initiative), though GDPR has certainly made data privacy mainstream. Given the extraterritorial effect of GDPR, the volume of attention and work involved has been staggering. I am heartened to see how seriously GDPR compliance is being taken by companies across the globe. There remains a fair amount of GDPR compliance catching up for many companies, while multinationals and their suppliers in particular will need to keep a close eye on monitoring compliance.

WHAT ARE THE BIGGEST CHALLENGES CURRENTLY AFFECTING LAWYERS IN THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS SPACE?

With traditional call volumes, revenues and margins falling, the focus for telecoms providers may turn to monetising new revenue streams, including IoT and/or the big data that they possess. Advising telecoms providers on how to monetise big data in light of GDPR is a major challenge in my view.

TO WHAT EXTENT DO YOU SEE ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE TRANSFORMING THE GLOBAL LEGAL ENVIRONMENT IN THE FUTURE?

I do not see AI transforming the global legal environment in the TMT sector in the next five to 10 years, albeit it will bring about further efficiencies. I see it more as part of the process of incrementally improving technology which will bring costs savings to high-volume matters whilst significantly enhancing the more mundane areas of legal practice. I still expect that in 10 years’ time we will have human in-house counsel and external counsel (even barristers!) advising on the more complex legal matters, albeit with a noticeable though not radical reduction in the number of lawyers in private practice.

RECENT YEARS HAVE SEEN SIGNIFICANT ADVANCES IN THE FIELD OF ROBOTICS. WHAT ARE THE MAIN LEGAL CHALLENGES POSED BY THESE DEVELOPMENTS?

One of the main legal challenges posed by advances in robotics is the question of liability and to what extent, if any, insurance will cover it. Take, for example, self-driving cars. Whose responsibility will it be to ensure that the latest software updates are continuously installed over the life cycle of a car through various owners? Do these software updates have to be provided for free and how will cyber-security levels be maintained to prevent hacking and the potential ensuing carnage on the streets? Ideally some form of cyber MOT ought to be considered in time.

Another interesting legal challenge is in the field of Intellectual Property. With increasingly sophisticated robotics out there involving so many different components developed by many companies and contractors, will there be a company that can demonstrate that it has sole or sufficient IPR title to sell or license the finished products and more importantly take overall responsibility for any defects?

HOW DOES PREISKEL & CO LLP DISTINGUISH ITSELF FROM THE COMPETITION IN AN EVER-MORE COMPETITIVE MARKET?

As I write this, the firm’s partners are all recognised telecoms experts in leading research guides and being a boutique focused on TMT helps distinguish us.

IN YOUR OPINION, HOW DO YOU THINK THE ROLE OF A TMT LAWYER WILL DEVELOP OVER THE NEXT FEW YEARS?

I expect there will be a greater emphasis on the legitimate monetisation of personal data and a greater need for telecoms regulatory expertise as more hardware will become connected by wireless technology to the internet. Cars are a case in point.

Practice Areas:

Follow us on LinkedIn

Practice Areas

Firms

Browse Firms

Search Firms

The Who's Who Legal 100

Awards

News & Features

Special Reports

Events

Shop

About Us

It is not possible to buy entry into any Who's Who Legal publication

Nominees have been selected based upon comprehensive, independent survey work with both general counsel and private practice lawyers worldwide. Only specialists who have met independent international research criteria are listed.

Copyright © 2019 Law Business Research Ltd. All rights reserved. | http://www.lbresearch.com

87 Lancaster Road, London, W11 1QQ, UK | Tel: +44 20 7908 1180 / Fax: +44 207 229 6910

http://www.whoswholegal.com | editorial@whoswholegal.com

Law Business Research Ltd

87 Lancaster Road, London
W11 1QQ, UK