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Thought Leaders - Competition 2021

Q&A

WWL Ranking: Thought Leader

WWL says

Mani Reinert is considered “one of the best in Switzerland” for his “impressive skills and the quality of his work”, and for his strong experience in antitrust proceedings.

Questions & Answers

Mani Reinert is a partner at Bär & Karrer and the head of the competition law / antitrust practice group. He graduated from the University of Zurich in 1994 and was admitted to the Zurich Bar in 2000. After his post as a research and teaching assistant at the University of Zurich he received his Master of Laws (LLM) from the New York University School of Law in 2002 and his Dr iur from the University of Zurich in 2003. He joined Bär & Karrer in 1997.

What attracted you to a career in the law? 

The rule of law is what distinguishes mankind from apes. Disputes are not solved by the use of brute force but by a predefined set of rules. The law is, or should be, the lubricant of the economy by providing a framework within which business can take place and foreseeability prevails. As an attorney you navigate clients through this set of rules, which has become more and more complex over time.

What do you enjoy most about your role as head of the firm’s competition practice? 

It gives me the opportunity to work with very talented people and on very interesting cases and, in some cases, to shape the law.

How has your practice adapted to the challenges of the coronavirus pandemic?

Compared to some of our clients who saw their markets disappear or who had to shut down their production temporarily, the legal industry had comparatively minor challenges to overcome.  There was a shift in our work to matters that affected the bottom line of the client. Internally, much of our communication became digital and we had to find new ways to integrate new lawyers into our team without in-person interaction.  

To what extent is antitrust becoming more politicised? 

There is a general trend that the government is expected to regulate every problem that arises. Political stakeholders no longer wait for the market to find a solution to a problem. Rather, they expect the lawmaker to solve this problem by issuing new laws or regulations. The more the lawmaker interferes with the market process, the more antitrust becomes politicised. One example is the phenomenon of higher prices in Switzerland. As a result of their higher wealth, Swiss pay higher prices than people abroad. Also the Swiss finish of regulations makes products more costly to produce in Switzerland. In a mostly symbolic effort, the lawmaker is about to amend the Act on Cartels to “solve” this perceived issue. 

What can be done to improve diversity in antitrust? 

Hire people with a view to their potential and talent. Do not only work with the established players.

To what extent does the market power of big tech companies need to be curtailed? 

While the US is a champion in pioneering big tech companies, Europe is a champion in regulating them. Maybe this is why Europe is not home to a single GAFA. I think there is no need for a new competition tool; the current system is sufficient. Regulators should also be aware that digital markets change quickly and any remedy imposed by the authorities may be outdated when it enters into force after a years-long investigation.

How can competition enforcement become faster and more effective? 

National authorities should focus on and engage in domestic cases that have an impact on the local economy. In that regard, “me too” investigations of the Swiss authorities like the Forex and LIBOR investigations are a gigantic waste of resources that could be deployed with more gain in “local” investigations. National authorities should focus their resources on significant cases and not go after every hunch in cases where it is evident from the beginning that there is no case.

What is the best piece of advice you have received? 

As an attorney, your job is to reduce complexity, to weigh the various risks and to lead your client with a recommendation. Also consider that the legal problem is often only a piece of the problem the client faces. Strive to keep the whole picture in view.

WWL says

Mani Reinert is considered “one of the best in Switzerland” for his “impressive skills and the quality of his work”, and for his strong experience in antitrust proceedings.

Questions & Answers

Mani Reinert is a partner at Bär & Karrer and the head of the competition law / antitrust practice group. He graduated from the University of Zurich in 1994 and was admitted to the Zurich Bar in 2000. After his post as a research and teaching assistant at the University of Zurich he received his Master of Laws (LLM) from the New York University School of Law in 2002 and his Dr iur from the University of Zurich in 2003. He joined Bär & Karrer in 1997.

What attracted you to a career in the law? 

The rule of law is what distinguishes mankind from apes. Disputes are not solved by the use of brute force but by a predefined set of rules. The law is, or should be, the lubricant of the economy by providing a framework within which business can take place and foreseeability prevails. As an attorney you navigate clients through this set of rules which has becomes more and more complex over time.

What do you enjoy most about your role as head of the firm’s competition practice? 

It gives me the opportunity to work with very talented people and on very interesting cases and, in some cases, to shape the law.

How has your practice adapted to the challenges of the coronavirus pandemic?

Compared to some of our clients which saw their markets disappear or which had to shut down their production temporarily, the legal industry had comparatively minor challenges to overcome.  There was a shift in our work to matters that affected the bottom line of the client. Internally much of our communication became digital and we had to find new ways to integrate new lawyers into our team without in-person interaction.  

To what extent is antitrust becoming more politicised? 

There is a general trend that the government is expected to regulate every problem that arises. The political stakeholders do not wait anymore for the market to find a solution to a problem. Rather, they expect the lawmaker to solve this problem by issuing new laws or regulations. The more the lawmaker interferes with the market process, the more antitrust becomes politicised. One example is the phenomenon of higher prices in Switzerland. As a result of their higher wealth Swiss pay higher prices than people abroad. Also the Swiss finish of regulations makes products more costly to produce in Switzerland. In a mostly symbolic effort, the lawmaker is about to amend the Act on Cartels to “solve” this perceived issue. 

What can be done to improve diversity in antitrust? 

Hire people with a view to their potential and talent. Do not only work with the established players.

To what extent does the market power of big tech companies need to be curtailed? 

While the US is a champion in pioneering big tech companies, Europe is a champion in regulating them. Maybe this is why Europe is not home to a single GAFA. I think there is no need for a new competition tool, the current system is sufficient. Regulators should also be aware that digital markets change quickly and any remedy imposed by the authorities may be outdated when it enters into force after a years-long investigation.

How can competition enforcement become faster and more effective? 

National authorities should focus and engage in domestic cases that have an impact on the local economy. In that regard me-too-investigations of the Swiss authorities like the Forex and LIBOR investigations are a gigantic waste of resources that could be deployed with more gain in “local” investigations. National authorities should focus their resources on significant cases and not go after very hunch in cases where it is evident from the beginning that there is no case.

What is the best piece of advice you have received? 

As an attorney, your job is to reduce complexity, to weigh the various risks and to lead your client with a recommendation. Also consider that the legal problem is often only a piece of the problem the client faces. Strive to keep the whole picture in view.

Global Leader

Competition 2020

Professional Biography

WWL Ranking: Recommended

WWL says

Mani Reinert is a favourite among market commentators. He is sought after for his expertise with merger filings before the Swiss Competition Commission. 

Peers and clients say:
"Mani is a highly recommended competition lawyer."
"He is highly experienced in this area."

Biography

Mani Reinert heads the competition law practice at Bär & Karrer. He is based in Zürich and has been partner since 2007.

Mani Reinert specialises in competition law. He is regularly retained by firms involved in investigations before the Swiss Competition Commission and appeals before the Federal Administrative Court and the Federal Supreme Court. His practice covers cartel investigations, investigations into the potential abuse of a dominant position and investigations into distribution practices in a broad range of industries. He also assists clients in dawn raids, in the implementation of compliance programmes and internal investigations. Besides, Mani Reinert advises clients in setting up and administering distribution networks.

Furthermore, Mani Reinert routinely represents clients in merger control filings before the Swiss Competition Commission and coordinates multi-jurisdictional merger control filings.

Moreover, Mani Reinert represents clients in competition law related civil litigation before Swiss courts.

He regularly speaks and publishes on competition law topics and is the co-editor of one of the leading commentaries on the Swiss competition law. Mani Reinert speaks German, English and French.

Mani Reinert is recognised as a leading competition lawyer by various ranking organisations such as Chambers EuropeThe Legal 500 Hall of Fame and Who's Who Legal

Mani Reinert holds a Dr iur from the University of Zürich and an LLM in corporate law from New York University. He is a member of the Zürich and Swiss Bar Association and of the Studienvereinigung Kartellrecht.

Bär & Karrer is a renowned Swiss law firm with more than 170 lawyers in Zurich, Geneva, Lugano and Zug. Its core business is advising clients on innovative and complex transactions and representing them in litigation, arbitration and regulatory proceedings. The firm's clients range from multinational corporations to private individuals in Switzerland and around the world.

Bär & Karrer has been repeatedly awarded Switzerland's "Law Firm of the Year" by the most prestigious international legal ranking agencies.

National Leader

Switzerland - Competition 2021

Professional Biography

WWL Ranking: Recommended

WWL says

The “superb” Mani Reinert of is “a well-established name” in competition law, who is “very capable and smart” in merger control issues.

Biography

Mani Reinert heads the competition law practice at Bär & Karrer. He is based in Zürich and has been partner since 2007.

Mani Reinert specialises in competition law. He is regularly retained by firms involved in investigations before the Swiss Competition Commission and appeals before the Federal Administrative Court and the Federal Supreme Court. His practice covers cartel investigations, investigations into the potential abuse of a dominant position and investigations into distribution practices in a broad range of industries. He also assists clients in dawn raids, in the implementation of compliance programmes and internal investigations. Besides, Mani Reinert advises clients in setting up and administering distribution networks.

Furthermore, Mani Reinert routinely represents clients in merger control filings before the Swiss Competition Commission and coordinates multi-jurisdictional merger control filings.

Moreover, Mani Reinert represents clients in competition law related civil litigation before Swiss courts.

He regularly speaks and publishes on competition law topics and is the co-editor of one of the leading commentaries on the Swiss competition law. Mani Reinert speaks German, English and French.

Mani Reinert is recognised as a leading competition lawyer by various ranking organisations such as Chambers EuropeThe Legal 500 Hall of Fame and Who's Who Legal

Mani Reinert holds a Dr iur from the University of Zürich and an LLM in corporate law from New York University. He is a member of the Zürich and Swiss Bar Association and of the Studienvereinigung Kartellrecht.

Bär & Karrer is a renowned Swiss law firm with more than 170 lawyers in Zurich, Geneva, Lugano and Zug. Its core business is advising clients on innovative and complex transactions and representing them in litigation, arbitration and regulatory proceedings. The firm's clients range from multinational corporations to private individuals in Switzerland and around the world.

Bär & Karrer has been repeatedly awarded Switzerland's "Law Firm of the Year" by the most prestigious international legal ranking agencies.

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