ao link
Who's Who Legal
Who's Who Legal
Menu
Thought Leaders

Thought Leaders

Thought Leader

WWL Ranking: Global Elite Thought Leader

WWL says

Kap-You (Kevin) Kim “is a key figure in the Korean arbitration market” who has built “a strong network of arbitrators and practitioners” and is widely considered “a statesman in the market”.

Questions & Answers

Kap-You (Kevin) is a senior founding partner at Peter & Kim in Seoul, a dispute resolution practice with offices in Korea, Switzerland, Australia and Singapore. Over the past 30 years, he has acted as counsel, presiding arbitrator, co-arbitrator and sole arbitrator in more than 300 cases of international arbitration under various arbitration rules. Among other positions that he holds, Kevin is presently vice president of the ICC International Court of Arbitration. 

What was it about arbitration that made it attractive as a specialism?

The international nature of arbitration and the opportunity to work on both common law and civil law matters made arbitration an attractive specialism. Therefore, after graduating from Seoul National University and qualifying as a lawyer in Korea, I chose to pursue an LLM from the Harvard Law School and qualified as an attorney in New York. Since then, practising international arbitration has allowed me to enjoy the appeal and challenges of both common law and civil law simultaneously. 

How have your roles as an arbitrator and as counsel enhanced each other respectively? 

I believe both roles have complemented each other. My experience as an arbitrator has enabled me to understand the needs of the tribunal when I am acting as counsel. I am able to present my client’s case better and can relate to the needs of a tribunal as I have been on the other side of the table. Similarly, my role as a counsel helps me appreciate the practical challenges of lawyers when I am seated as an arbitrator. I think it also puts the counsel at ease and enables them to present their case effectively. Ultimately, it is the parties who benefit from my experiences as arbitrator and a counsel.

In which jurisdictions would you like to expand your practice and why?

Peter & Kim has received an overwhelming response since its launch. The firm’s practice is rooted in both the west and the east, and the whole world is our playground. Our offices in Switzerland, Korea, Australia and Singapore have been able to serve clients from these jurisdictions and elsewhere. In brief, while we would like to go deeper into our strengths, we would also like to expand in new jurisdictions. As to the why, I think the world is getting more connected by the day (at a faster speed now!) and we would like more clients to experience bespoke and high-quality service that our existing clients reach out to us for. 

Has covid-19 had an impact on commercial arbitration? Are parties willing to be flexible in procedure and approach to get it over the line?

The general trend shows that parties are flexible. Parties sometimes display a strong wish or dislike for virtual hearings, which may cause tensions with respect to time and costs – one party may want to proceed with a virtual hearing, while the opposing party may prefer an in-person hearing. However, parties in general appear to be willing to adapt to the prevailing circumstances.

Do you expect measures taken by states to prevent the spread of the virus to result in investment treaty claims, and would any such claims be likely to succeed?

There might be such claims, and like every other claim, the success or failure will depend on the facts of each case. Every industry will react differently to such measures, and therefore it is difficult to forecast the fate of such claims at the moment. 

What inspired you to co-found Peter & Kim, the first ever transcontinental arbitration boutique?

We established Peter & Kim to offer a truly international platform with a team culturally rooted in Asia-Pacific and Western Europe. We saw a gap in the market and tapped that opportunity. We are very grateful to our clients and peers for their overwhelming response. We are able to represent Korean clients as we did before and have been able to get more opportunities to represent international clients as a result of our synergy with Europe. 

What advice would you give to someone looking to start their own firm?

I think having the right team is crucial to starting a successful law firm. The right team members are the ones who share your vision. It is, therefore, most important to have people with the right attitude. Skills, although crucial, can be learned. However, the right attitude is innate, and one should, therefore, be mindful while picking the people for the team. It is also important to set short-term goals so that the team remains motivated by watching their efforts bear results. Next, one cannot survive in the legal market without being competitive. Therefore, a law firm must provide high-quality services to every client irrespective of their size. Lastly, it is important to hire specialists to handle the administration of the firm. Hence support staff such as financial, management, and marketing experts are also crucial for the successful operation of a firm. 

If you could implement one reform in international arbitration, what would it be?

The Gangnam Principles, which call for multiple preliminary hearings scheduled early in the proceedings to narrow down and sort out the issues of a case before the main hearing. The parties get an opportunity to present their arguments and the tribunal can determine the key issues through an interactive session at an earlier point in the proceedings. The hearings, to the extent possible, should be held virtually so as to reduce the number of witnesses and to reduce the overall length of the hearing, which would not have to last an entire day but rather half days scheduled over the course of several weeks or months. The Gangnam Principles would allow the parties and the tribunal to slowly but steadily learn more about the case while saving time and money, before the final hearing on the merits. 

WWL Ranking: Thought Leader

WWL says

Kap-You (Kevin) Kim “is a key figure in the Korean arbitration market” who has built “a strong network of arbitrators and practitioners” and is widely considered “a statesman in the market”.

Questions & Answers

Kap-You (Kevin) Kim is a senior partner at Peter & Kim in Seoul, a dispute resolution practice with offices in Korea, Switzerland, Australia and Singapore. Over the past 30 years, he has acted as counsel, presiding arbitrator, co-arbitrator and sole arbitrator in more than 300 cases of international arbitration under various arbitration rules. Among other positions that he holds, Kevin is presently vice president of the ICC International Court of Arbitration.

What inspired you to pursue a legal career? 

I studied law at Seoul National University, after which I qualified as a lawyer in Korea. However, I had always been interested in international disputes, so I chose to attend Harvard Law School where I obtained an LLM and qualified as an attorney in New York. The skills I acquired there allow me to now enjoy both the appeal and the challenges of common and civil law. 

Has covid-19 had an impact on commercial arbitration? Are parties willing to be flexible in procedure and approach to get it over the line? 

The general trend shows that parties are flexible. Parties sometimes display a strong wish or dislike for virtual hearings, which may cause tensions as to time and costs purposes: one party may want to proceed with a virtual hearing, while the opposing party might rebuff such idea. However, parties generally appear willing to adapt to the current circumstances.

How did establishing the first ever transcontinental arbitration boutique match your expectations? 

We established Peter & Kim with the goal to offer a truly international platform with a team culturally rooted in Asia-Pacific and Western Europe. So far, the market response has been positive. We are able to represent Korean clients as we did before, and have been able to get more opportunities to represent international clients as a result of our synergy with Europe, which is an advantage for the clients. 

It has been noted that mediation is increasingly being used to resolve construction disputes. Why do you think it is becoming more popular as a form of dispute resolution? 

Mediation is indeed increasingly used. Half of our recent cases have involved mediation, either before or in conjunction with arbitration. I believe that the breakthrough for mediation started a couple years ago. Counsels have now more experience in mediation and recommend it more actively to clients as they recognise that it offers good results while cutting down on costs and time. 

Are cash flow issues stopping parties from bringing claims? 

Personally, we have yet to have any issue regarding cash flow. We have seen some hearings being postponed. However, procedural hearings with no witness examination continue to take place. We have also experienced virtual hearings with remote witness examination. We also have not heard of any similar issues for clients or other law firms. However, I believe that arbitrators might be more impacted if delays arise. 

To what extent can virtual hearings be relied on to decide high-stakes multibillion-dollar cases between parties? 

The issue is not so much related to the amount in dispute than it is to the client’s perception of virtual hearings. Governments are usually more reluctant to use virtual hearings and prefer traditional in-person hearings. They may accept partial virtual hearings, but it appears unlikely that a government will allow a case to be held entirely virtually. Commercial parties are more inclined to accept virtual hearings as long as the integrity of the proceedings are guaranteed. 

If you could implement one reform in international arbitration, what would it be? 

The Gangnam Principles, which call for multiple preliminary hearings scheduled early in the proceedings to sort out the issues of the case before the main hearing. They would allow for the parties to make their arguments early on and for an interactive session with the tribunal to determine the issues. The hearings do not have to be in person – they could be virtual so as to reduce the number of witnesses, shorten the examination and, overall, reduce the length of the hearing, which would not have to last an entire day but rather half days scheduled over the course of several weeks or months. The Gangnam Principles would allow for the parties and tribunal to slowly but steadily learn more about the case while saving time and money. 

What steps can younger arbitration practitioners take to improve their chances of getting appointments? Is there an important role to play here for experienced lawyers? 

I would suggest that experienced lawyers nominate younger arbitration practitioners as chairperson. Younger practitioners usually get their first appointments on small cases or as emergency arbitrators. However, I believe that this is not ideal as experience is required to deal with emergency cases in a satisfying manner. But as a chairperson, the younger practitioner would be able to learn, research and study the case while being assisted by experienced lawyers as co-arbitrators, who would provide guidance and assistance. 

Thought Leaders - Construction 2020

Q&A

WWL Ranking: Thought Leader

WWL says

Kap-You (Kevin) Kim is an arbitration specialist renowned for his adept handling of high-value construction disputes.

Questions & Answers

Kap-You (Kevin) Kim is a senior founding partner at Peter & Kim in Seoul, a dispute resolution practice with offices in Korea, Switzerland, Australia, and Singapore. Over the past 30 years, he has acted as a counsel, presiding arbitrator, co-arbitrator, and sole arbitrator in more than 300 international commercial and investment arbitration matters under various institutional rules. Among other positions that he holds, Kevin is currently the Vice President of the ICC International Court of Arbitration.
Describe your career to date.
I have devoted my career to the practice and growth of international arbitration. I hold degrees from the Seoul National University College of Law (LL.B, LL.M) and Harvard Law School (LL.M). After realising the importance of international arbitration and the role it could play in the growth of trade and commerce, I pushed its use in Korea and North-East Asia. I established the arbitration and international litigation practice at my previous firm, Bae, Kim, and Lee LLC, which I led for close to two decades. I now head Peter & Kim, a niche international disputes practice with offices in Switzerland, Korea, Australia, and Singapore.
What do you enjoy most about working in the construction space?
I have always enjoyed working with the technicalities involved in complex industries and it is one of the major factors why construction disputes interest me. If I were not a lawyer, perhaps I could be an engineer as I have a keen interest in learning and studying engineering issues. So, working on construction-related disputes is akin to living vicariously, what could be my alternate career. Additionally, it is very enriching to meet engineers and experts in the construction industry and get deep insights from them about cutting edge developments in the field.
How has your practice developed since you first started practising?
My practice has developed organically and has diversified into various fields within the construction industry. I have been involved in energy arbitrations including those relating to nuclear power plants, thanks to several disputes that surfaced on a variety of issues in the area. Over the years, I have developed a certain level of comfort in dealing with a wide array of construction matters across various sectors.
How has covid-19 impacted your construction practice?
As many construction projects have stalled or slowed down, they are in the process of giving rise to potential claims. Some disputes have already taken form and the parties are exchanging legal submissions. At least for now, the covid-19 pandemic has only increased the workload of construction disputes. Only time will tell how it will affect the coming months.
What are the main challenges facing those looking to develop infrastructure projects in Korea?
There are two-fold challenges that might worry anyone looking to develop infrastructure projects in Korea (or for that matter anywhere across the globe).
First, the market is very volatile because of which there is uncertainty about the future. Also, since this pandemic is unprecedented, there is no reference point for any business to take intelligible steps. Several large infrastructure projects, for example, that of large airports, face an uncertain future. The aviation industry has been one of the worst-hit industries and any recovery of cost based on any anticipated revenue seems to have fallen flat. Thus, market changes have been quite abrupt and there is hardly any clarity about how and when the market will improve.
Second, are the strict health regulations. It is difficult to draw an anticipated dateline for any infrastructure project because the government is adapting to a changing situation and have to take measures such as to restrict the movement of people. This will affect any infrastructure project as it will lead to cost and time overrun.
What impact do you think third-party funding will have on construction disputes in the coming years?
Third-party funders are quite active and more so now given that several construction companies are on tight financial budgets. Therefore, it is quite likely that we will see an increase in the number of cases where third-party funders are involved. While it is good for the eco-system, it can also raise concerns such as that of indemnification, and identification of the relevant parties.
I am a firm believer that every problem has a solution. The arbitration and construction ecosystems have overcome several hurdles before, and this one should not be difficult.
How will possible labour shortages affect the approach of clients in their day-to-day processes post covid-19?
I can answer this question as an observer of the industry. Contrary to what the question suggests, post-covid-19 there may not be a shortage of labour anymore. It is likely that the sudden demand and surge in construction activity will only attract labourers. After all, labourers are daily wage earners who have been badly hit by the pandemic on a personal level. Most of them are waiting for the opportunity to restart their lives. Therefore, I see the non-availability of labour only as a temporary problem during the subsistence of covid-19 and not post covid-19. However, I do think that the pandemic will push the construction industry towards advanced automation so that minimum human involvement yields maximum results.
What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?
To not assume but to investigate. Fact findings and listening to engineers are the most important steps – whether as a counsel or an arbitrator.

Global Leader

Arbitration 2021

Professional Biography

WWL Ranking: Recommended

Peers and clients say

"He is a key figure in the Korean arbitration market"
"Kevin is outstanding"
"He is a top Korean arbitration practitioner"
"A senior statesman of Korean arbitration"

Biography

Kap-You (Kevin) Kim is a founding partner at Peter & Kim in Seoul. He was previously a senior partner at Bae, Kim & Lee LLC, where he was the co-founder and head of the firm’s international arbitration practice and the head of its domestic and international disputes group. Under his supervision, Bae, Kim & Lee LLC’s international arbitration practice was listed in the GAR30 list of top arbitration practices worldwide in 2011, and was listed among the GAR 30 – 40 in 2018 and 2019.

In 2019, Kevin, together with co-founder Dr Wolfgang Peter of Switzerland, founded the law firm of Peter & Kim to establish the first-ever transcontinental arbitration boutique.

Kevin has been actively involved in international arbitration for the past three decades and has amassed a wealth of experience both as counsel and arbitrator. He has been involved in arbitrations conducted under various major rules and seated in all the prominent arbitration venues. He is presently involved in a number of investment and commercial arbitrations as counsel and arbitrator, and is also serving as the president of an ICSID ad-hoc annulment committee.

He is considered a market leader in international arbitration by various industry rankings, with Chambers Asia reporting that clients consider Kevin to be "one of the most respected figures in the Asian arbitration space" and Who’s Who Legal listing him as one of its “Global Elite Thought Leaders” for international arbitration in 2020.

Among other positions that he holds, Kevin is presently a vice president of the ICC International Court of Arbitration, advisory board member of the International Council for Commercial Arbitration (ICCA), and chairman of the KCAB International Arbitration Committee.

In the past, Kevin has served as Secretary-General of ICCA (2010–2014), member of the LCIA Court (2007–2012), and vice-chair of the IBA arbitration committee (2008–2010).

Kevin holds degrees from Seoul National University College of Law (LLB, LLM) and Harvard Law School (LLM). He has authored several publications on international arbitration and litigation practice and was general editor of Arbitration Law of Korea: Practice & Procedure (Juris Publishing, 2012), the first hornbook on arbitration in Korea written in English. He also authored Arbitration Law & Practice (Pakyoungsa, 2012), a hornbook on arbitration in the Korean language. Kevin is licensed to practise in Korea and New York, and speaks Korean (native), English (fluent), and Japanese (conversational).

Construction 2020

Professional Biography

WWL Ranking: Recommended

WWL says

Kap-You (Kevin) Kim is an arbitration specialist renowned for his adept handling of high-value construction disputes.

Biography

Kap-You (Kevin) Kim is a senior partner at Peter & Kim in Seoul. He was previously a senior partner at Bae, Kim & Lee LLC, where he was the co-founder and head of the firm’s international arbitration practice and the head of its domestic and international disputes group. Under his supervision, Bae, Kim & Lee LLC’s international arbitration practice was listed in the GAR30 list of top arbitration practices worldwide in 2011, and was listed among the GAR 30 – 40 in 2018 and 2019.

In 2019, Kevin, together with co-founder Wolfgang Peter of Switzerland, founded the law firm of Peter & Kim with the aim of establishing the first ever transcontinental arbitration boutique. 

Kevin has been actively involved in international arbitration for the past three decades and has amassed a wealth of experience both as counsel and arbitrator. He has been involved in arbitrations conducted under all the major rules and seated in all the prominent arbitration venues. He is presently involved in a number of investment and commercial arbitrations as counsel and arbitrator, and is also serving as the president of an ICSID ad-hoc annulment committee.

He is considered a market leader in international arbitration by various industry rankings, with Chambers Asia reporting that clients consider Kevin to be "one of the most respected figures in the Asian arbitration space" and Who’s Who Legal listing him as one of its “Global Elite Thought Leaders” for international arbitration in 2020.

Among other positions that he holds, Kevin is presently a vice president of the ICC International Court of Arbitration, advisory board member of the International Council for Commercial Arbitration (ICCA), council member of the American Arbitration Association (AAA/ICDR) and chairman of the Korean Commercial Arbitration Board’s (KCAB) international arbitration committee.

In the past, Kevin has served as secretary general of ICCA (2010–2014), member of the LCIA Court (2007–2012) and vice chair of the IBA arbitration committee (2008–2010).

Kevin holds degrees from the Seoul National University College of Law (LLB, LLM) and Harvard Law School (LLM). He has authored a number of publications on international arbitration and litigation practice and was general editor of Arbitration Law of Korea: Practice & Procedure (Juris Publishing, 2012), the first hornbook on arbitration in Korea written in English. He also authored Arbitration Law & Practice (Bakyoungsa, 2012), a hornbook on arbitration in the Korean language. Kevin is licensed to practise in Korea and New York, and speaks Korean (native), English (fluent) and Japanese (conversational).

Litigation 2020

Professional Biography

WWL Ranking: Recommended

WWL says

Kevin Kim sits among some of Korea's most revered disputes lawyers thanks to his three decades of experience representing clients across a broad range of industries and sectors in contentious proceedings.

Biography

Kap-You (Kevin) Kim is a senior founding partner at Peter & Kim in Seoul. He was previously a senior partner at Bae, Kim & Lee LLC, where he was the co-founder and head of the firm’s international arbitration practice and the head of its domestic and international disputes group. Under his leadership, Bae, Kim & Lee LLC’s international arbitration practice was listed in the GAR 30 list of top arbitration practices worldwide in 2011 and was listed among the GAR 30–40 in 2018 and 2019.

In 2019, Kevin, together with Dr Wolfgang Peter of Switzerland, founded the law firm of Peter & Kim to establish the first-ever transcontinental arbitration boutique.

Kevin has been actively involved in international arbitration for the past three decades and has amassed a wealth of experience both as counsel and arbitrator. He has been involved in arbitrations conducted under various major rules and seated in all the prominent arbitration jurisdictions. He is presently involved in a number of investment and commercial arbitrations as counsel and arbitrator, and is also serving as the president of an ICSID ad-hoc annulment committee.

He is considered a market leader in international arbitration by various industry rankings. Chambers Asia reports that clients consider Kevin to be "one of the most respected figures in the Asian arbitration space" and Who’s Who Legal listed him as one of its “Global Elite Thought Leaders” for international arbitration in 2020.

Among other positions that he holds, Kevin is presently the vice president of the ICC International Court of Arbitration, advisory board member of the International Council for Commercial Arbitration (ICCA), and chairman of the Korean Commercial Arbitration Board’s (KCAB) international arbitration committee.

In the past, Kevin has served as secretary-general of ICCA (2010–2014), member of the LCIA Court (2007–2012), and vice-chair of the IBA arbitration committee (2008–2010).

Kevin holds degrees from Seoul National University College of Law (LLB, LLM) and Harvard Law School (LLM). He has authored several publications on international arbitration and litigation practice and was the general editor of Arbitration Law of Korea: Practice & Procedure (Juris Publishing, 2012), the first hornbook on arbitration in Korea written in English. He has also authored Arbitration Law & Practice (Pakyoungsa, 2012), a hornbook on arbitration in the Korean language. Kevin is licensed to practise in Korea and New York. He speaks Korean (native), English (fluent), and Japanese (conversational).

National Leader

Korea - Arbitration 2020

Professional Biography

WWL Ranking: Recommended

WWL says

Kap-You (Kevin) Kim is a “big name in the market” and is considered “brilliant at arbitration”. 

Biography

Kap-You (Kevin) Kim is a senior founding partner at Peter & Kim in Seoul. He was previously a senior partner at Bae, Kim & Lee LLC, where he was the co-founder and head of the firm’s international arbitration practice and the head of its domestic and international disputes group. Under his supervision, Bae, Kim & Lee LLC’s international arbitration practice was listed in the GAR30 list of top arbitration practices worldwide in 2011, and was listed among the GAR 30 – 40 in 2018 and 2019.

In 2019, Kevin, together with co-founder Dr Wolfgang Peter of Switzerland, founded the law firm of Peter & Kim to establish the first-ever transcontinental arbitration boutique.

Kevin has been actively involved in international arbitration for the past three decades and has amassed a wealth of experience both as counsel and arbitrator. He has been involved in arbitrations conducted under various major rules and seated in all the prominent arbitration venues. He is presently involved in a number of investment and commercial arbitrations as counsel and arbitrator, and is also serving as the president of an ICSID ad-hoc annulment committee.

He is considered a market leader in international arbitration by various industry rankings, with Chambers Asia reporting that clients consider Kevin to be "one of the most respected figures in the Asian arbitration space" and Who’s Who Legal listing him as one of its “Global Elite Thought Leaders” for international arbitration in 2020.

Among other positions that he holds, Kevin is presently vice president of the ICC International Court of Arbitration, advisory board member of the International Council for Commercial Arbitration (ICCA), and chairman of the Korean Commercial Arbitration Board’s (KCAB) international arbitration committee.

In the past, Kevin has served as secretary-general of ICCA (2010–2014), member of the LCIA Court (2007–2012), and vice-chair of the IBA arbitration committee (2008–2010).

Kevin holds degrees from Seoul National University College of Law (LLB, LLM) and Harvard Law School (LLM). He has authored several publications on international arbitration and litigation practice and was general editor of Arbitration Law of Korea: Practice & Procedure (Juris Publishing, 2012), the first hornbook on arbitration in Korea written in English. He also authored Arbitration Law & Practice (Pakyoungsa, 2012), a hornbook on arbitration in the Korean language. Kevin is licensed to practise in Korea and New York, and speaks Korean (native), English (fluent), and Japanese (conversational).

WWL Ranking: Recommended

WWL says

Kap-You (Kevin) Kim is singled out by peers as “a very respected arbitration lawyer practising construction disputes”. 

Biography

Kap-You (Kevin) Kim is a senior founding partner at Peter & Kim in Seoul. He was previously a senior partner at Bae, Kim & Lee LLC, where he was the co-founder and head of the firm’s international arbitration practice and the head of its domestic and international disputes group. Under his supervision, Bae, Kim & Lee LLC’s international arbitration practice was listed in the GAR30 list of top arbitration practices worldwide in 2011, and was listed among the GAR 30 – 40 in 2018 and 2019.

In 2019, Kevin, together with co-founder Dr. Wolfgang Peter of Switzerland, founded the law firm of Peter & Kim to establish the first-ever transcontinental arbitration boutique.

Kevin has been actively involved in international arbitration for the past three decades and has amassed a wealth of experience both as counsel and arbitrator. He has been involved in arbitrations conducted under various major rules and seated in all the prominent arbitration venues. He is presently involved in a number of investment and commercial arbitrations as counsel and arbitrator, and is also serving as the president of an ICSID ad-hoc annulment committee.

He is considered a market leader in international arbitration by various industry rankings, with Chambers Asia reporting that clients consider Kevin to be "one of the most respected figures in the Asian arbitration space" and Who’s Who Legal listing him as one of its “Global Elite Thought Leaders” for international arbitration in 2020.

Among other positions that he holds, Kevin is presently vice president of the ICC International Court of Arbitration, advisory board member of the International Council for Commercial Arbitration (ICCA), and chairman of the Korean Commercial Arbitration Board’s (KCAB) international arbitration committee.

In the past, Kevin has served as secretary-general of ICCA (2010–2014), member of the LCIA Court (2007–2012), and vice-chair of the IBA arbitration committee (2008–2010).

Kevin holds degrees from Seoul National University College of Law (LLB, LLM) and Harvard Law School (LLM). He has authored several publications on international arbitration and litigation practice and was general editor of Arbitration Law of Korea: Practice & Procedure (Juris Publishing, 2012), the first hornbook on arbitration in Korea written in English. He also authored Arbitration Law & Practice (Pakyoungsa, 2012), a hornbook on arbitration in the Korean language. Kevin is licensed to practise in Korea and New York, and speaks Korean (native), English (fluent) and Japanese (conversational).

Korea - Litigation 2020

Professional Biography

WWL Ranking: Recommended

WWL says

Kap-You (Kevin) Kim is well thought of among peers for his first-class advocacy in domestic and international disputes across a range of industries, from energy to automotives.

Biography

Kap-You (Kevin) Kim is a senior founding partner at Peter & Kim in Seoul. He was previously a senior partner at Bae, Kim & Lee LLC, where he was the co-founder and head of the firm’s international arbitration practice and the head of its domestic and international disputes group. Under his supervision, Bae, Kim & Lee LLC’s international arbitration practice was listed in the GAR30 list of top arbitration practices worldwide in 2011, and was listed among the GAR 30 – 40 in 2018 and 2019.

In 2019, Kevin, together with co-founder Dr Wolfgang Peter of Switzerland, founded the law firm of Peter & Kim to establish the first ever transcontinental arbitration boutique.

Kevin has been actively involved in international arbitration for the past three decades and has amassed a wealth of experience both as counsel and arbitrator. He has been involved in arbitrations conducted under various major rules and seated in all the prominent arbitration venues. He is presently involved in a number of investment and commercial arbitrations as counsel and arbitrator, and is also serving as the president of an ICSID ad-hoc annulment committee.

He is considered a market leader in international arbitration by various industry rankings, with Chambers Asia reporting that clients consider Kevin to be "one of  the most respected figures in the Asian arbitration space" and Who’s Who Legal listing him as one of its “Global Elite Thought Leaders” for international arbitration in 2020.

Among other positions that he holds, Kevin is presently vice president of the ICC International Court of Arbitration, advisory board member of the International Council for Commercial Arbitration (ICCA), and chairman of the Korean Commercial Arbitration Board’s (KCAB) international arbitration committee.

In the past, Kevin has served as secretary-general of ICCA (2010–2014), member of the LCIA Court (2007–2012), and vice-chair of the IBA arbitration committee (2008–2010).

Kevin holds degrees from Seoul National University College of Law (LLB, LLM) and Harvard Law School (LLM). He has authored several publications on international arbitration and litigation practice and was general editor of Arbitration Law of Korea: Practice & Procedure (Juris Publishing, 2012), the first hornbook on arbitration in Korea written in English. He also authored Arbitration Law & Practice (Pakyoungsa, 2012), a hornbook on arbitration in the Korean language. Kevin is licensed to practise in Korea and New York, and speaks Korean (native), English (fluent) and Japanese (conversational).

Law Business Research
Law Business Research Ltd
Meridian House, 34-35 Farringdon Street
London EC4A 4HL, UK
© Law Business Research Ltd 1998-2021. All rights reserved.
Company No.: 03281866