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WWL Ranking: Global Elite Thought Leader

WWL says

Douglas Jones AO is "a very experienced practitioner" and "a construction law specialist". He is well versed in acting as arbitrator in international commercial and investor state arbitrations.

Questions & Answers

Doug Jones AO is a leading independent international commercial and investor-state arbitrator with over 40 years’ prior experience as an international transactional and disputes project lawyer. He is also an International Judge of the Singapore International Commercial Court, and practises from bases in London (Atkin Chambers), Sydney (Sydney Arbitration Chambers), and Toronto (Arbitration Place). Doug has arbitrated matters involving infrastructure, power generation, oil and gas, mining, joint ventures, post M&A, defence contracts and tourism, with values in dispute up to many billions US$.

How does your background in contentious and non-contentious infrastructure matters affect how you approach arbitrations?

I find that an understanding of the interests of the multiple parties in such projects (owners, constructors, subcontractors, suppliers, financiers and equity providers) enables me to appreciate the issues in such arbitrations, and the purpose and need for the complex network of agreements which are often involved.

With the current debate still ongoing over the legitimacy of investor-state arbitration, what steps might be taken to ensure that international commercial arbitrations maintain their standing?

The debate surrounding the legitimacy of investor-state arbitrations is primarily focused on the issue of transparency in investor-state dispute settlement, and the concern with “interference” in legitimate governance issues, and that matters of public interest should not be decided behind closed doors. Similar concerns regarding transparency have bled into discussions surrounding international commercial arbitrations. Increased transparency – that is, not only the increased public access to proceedings themselves, but the increased information about arbitral procedure pre- and post-hearing and about the counsel and arbitrators who participate in it – can increase the legitimacy and efficiency of international commercial arbitration. This transparency must of course be evaluated alongside equally important considerations of confidentiality, but I see these two tenets as sitting on a spectrum on which an appropriate balance can, and should, be reached. 

How might the movement of trade from euro-centrism to the Asia-Pacific region impact the arbitration sector?

The growth of trade and economic activity within the Asia-Pacific region has increased and greatly expanded arbitration in the region. For example, it is likely that the unprecedented number and scale of infrastructure developments proposed within the Belt and Road initiative will generate numerous commercial and investor-state challenges. Places such as Singapore, Seoul and Hong Kong are now global hubs of arbitration. Significant new growth can be expected in emerging economies in Asia, such as India, Malaysia, Indonesia, Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines. The challenge for these jurisdictions is to ensure that they develop as “arbitration-friendly” seats.

What challenges are unique to disputes pertaining to large and complex P3 infrastructure projects?

One of the largest challenges posed by complex PPP infrastructure projects is ensuring that risk in the project is allocated fairly within the contract matrix. Balancing the interests of the government, equity investors, financiers, service providers and contractors is a commercial, not just a legal, challenge.

When it comes to dispute resolution, using arbitration presents a particular challenge given the many different parties to the complex web of separate contracts. The arbitration of multi-party disputes presents particular challenges not necessarily present in court proceedings.

What challenges has the deluge of data in construction disputes posed? How have you ensured you are well equipped to handle them? 

Construction disputes are factually and legally data and fact intensive, raising unique challenges. Real and special effort is involved in avoiding “missing the wood for the trees”, and decision-making paralysis due to information overload.

Meeting these challenges requires deploying procedural and technological innovation within the arbitral process. There are many proactive case management techniques available to arbitrators who should strive to deploy them to create bespoke processes to meet the needs of the particular dispute. Technological innovation should also be encouraged. 

What tips would you give for effectively managing experts in international commercial arbitrations? 

Experts, especially party-appointed experts, present a conundrum: they are paid by their parties but should independently assist the tribunal. Resolving this tension is a little like untying a Gordian knot. It is necessary to adopt a practical framework which focuses on limiting the differences between the expert evidence prior to the evidentiary hearing. This minimises cost and time for the parties, as the evidence to be tendered is limited in scope to only that which is necessary to determine the real issues in dispute. In particular, there is, in my view, great advantage in requiring experts of similar discipline to first produce a joint expert report identifying areas of agreement and disagreement, before they prepare individual reports on areas of disagreement. Also, experts can be asked to adopt their counterpart’s assumptions, or approach so that tribunals can understand each expert’s view of the outcome of the differences between them. 

How has your academic activity enhanced your knowledge and skills?

I have always found that teaching and research enhances the capacity to be a thoughtful, informed lawyer, and now arbitrator. 

What skills and traits would you encourage in the next generation of arbitration lawyers?

I would encourage the next generation of arbitration lawyers to challenge themselves to innovate in the interests of their clients, and to take the opportunity to enhance for users the capacity of arbitration to remain relevant, and “fit for purpose” in international dispute resolution.

WWL Ranking: Global Elite Thought Leader
WWL Ranking: Thought Leader

WWL says

Douglas Jones AO enjoys a stellar international reputation among peers who consider him “an absolute star of construction arbitration”.​

Questions & Answers

Doug Jones AO is a leading independent international commercial arbitrator and an international judge of the Singapore International Commercial Court. His matters include infrastructure, energy, commodities, commercial and joint ventures, and investor-state disputes spanning more than 30 jurisdictions. He has extensive experience as an arbitrator under ICC, LCIA, ICDR, SIAC, SCC, DIAC, KCAB, ACICA, European Development Fund Arbitration and Conciliation Rules, as well as the ICSID and UNCITRAL Rules, in disputes of values exceeding some billions of US dollars.

What do clients look for in an effective panel or sole arbitrator?

It goes without saying that clients are looking for arbitrators that can effectively and efficiently resolve their dispute. This requires a willingness to take initiative and devise creative solutions to the issues in dispute, bearing in mind the commercial interests of the parties. 

What are the main challenges of having such a global practice?

A challenge associated with having a global arbitration practice is the need to be cognisant of procedural requirements imposed by different jurisdictions. Many jurisdictions have different requirements for the form of arbitral awards. Likewise, the practices of civil law and common law jurisdictions vary. 

On a more practical note, having a global practice requires both flexibility and organisation when balancing commitments in different time zones. These challenges are, however, part and parcel of the exciting life of an international arbitrator!

How can procedures be changed to make arbitration more effective?

There is no one-size-fits-all approach in arbitration. Instead, arbitral procedure should be designed and tailored to the dispute. I am a strong advocate for the development of bespoke procedures designed to address the real issues in dispute. The use of sampling techniques and proportional recovery are some examples of best practice that efficiently resolve disputes.  

Technology has been gaining an increasingly important role in legal practice. How have you seen it develop in international arbitration?

It is critical that arbitration, as with other areas of legal practice, remains open to new technology, particularly where it will reduce cost and delay. During my time as an arbitrator, I have witnessed the rapid development of technology and its successful deployment in international arbitrations. It is important that arbitrators remain aware of technological advances and encourage their use where these technologies will reduce cost and delay. 

You have often implemented case management conferences in your arbitrations. How successful have these been?

In my experience, both at an early stage and throughout the arbitration, case management conferences have proven to be an effective tool to uncover the real issues in dispute. In most arbitrations over which I have presided, at least one further case management conference prior to the main evidentiary hearing has proved useful to settle expert issues, methodology, and other procedural issues. 

How do you see commercial courts developing their relationship with arbitration?

The proliferation of international commercial courts in recent years presents opportunities for international arbitration to develop. I view international commercial courts as a companion, rather than a competitor, to international commercial arbitration, with each filling any gaps in the services offered by the other. 

Where in your opinion does the future of international arbitration lie? 

In my opinion, the future of international arbitration looks bright. However, its ongoing success depends on its ability to respond to changing client needs. The continual development of alternative forms of dispute resolution should also serve as motivation for arbitration to continually adapt and innovate to remain a preferred form of international dispute resolution.

What steps can younger arbitration practitioners take to improve their chances of getting appointments? Is there an important role to play here for experienced lawyers?

I would advise younger practitioners to make the most of every opportunity that presents itself. They should seek to develop an understanding of a wide range of areas, join arbitral organisations and engage with academic discourse. Experienced arbitrators have a responsibility to promote younger practitioners and encourage their development, through formal and informal mentoring. 

Thought Leaders - Construction 2020

Q&A

WWL Ranking: Thought Leader

WWL says

Global Elite Thought Leader Doug Jones AO is renowned as a “very impressive arbitrator” who “manages the process with exceptional efficiency”.

Questions & Answers

Doug Jones AO is a leading independent international commercial and investor-state arbitrator. He is also an international judge of the Singapore International Commercial Court. His matters include infrastructure, energy, commodities, commercial and joint ventures, and investor-state disputes spanning more than 30 jurisdictions. He has extensive experience as an arbitrator under ICC, LCIA, AAA, ICDR, KLRCA, SIAC, DIAC, ACICA, IAMA, AMINZ, European Development Fund Arbitration and Conciliation Rules, as well as the ICSID and UNCITRAL Rules, in disputes worth up to some billions of US dollars.

What led you to develop an interest in the construction field?

I was drawn to the field due to the intellectual challenges posed by construction disputes, which are notorious for their complexity. Devising ways to help parties fairly identify the key issues, and streamline the process, is a key role of a tribunal and critically important in such disputes.

Working closely with others in pursuit of a common goal in the delivery of these projects has also been a source of motivation and satisfaction. Being able to witness the ongoing use and value of many of the projects with which I have been involved with has been immensely rewarding.

To what extent is the construction industry a particularly dispute-prone one?

In my experience, the construction industry is extremely dispute-prone. Construction projects in the modern age are of a completely new breed to those in the past. Prior to the industrial revolution, there were typically only two parties to a construction contract: the owner commissioning the project; and the master builder, who undertook both the design and building components of the work. Today, however, with the birth of specialisation, construction projects are an intricate web of contracts and subcontracts, as owners rely on numerous specialists to undertake individual components of the project. On top of this, the scale and long-term nature of construction projects means that funding is often provided by external financiers. As a result, it is not unusual for a construction project to involve many participants, including subcontractors, financiers, insurers, suppliers, architects, engineers and of course, the employer and contractor.

The consequence of the sheer complexity and number of moving parts within today’s construction projects is that there are far more instances in which disputes are prone to arise. Construction disputes are additionally associated with high levels of risk due to unforeseeable economic, political and climatic forces that may impact delivery. Megaprojects in the construction industry are only set to increase in size and complexity, and so too are the disputes that will arise out of them.

The construction industry often turns to arbitration for dispute resolution. What steps are courts taking to offer a rival forum for dispute resolution in the construction market?

The establishment of specialist lists in domestic courts – such as the Technology and Construction Court in the UK, and the construction list of the New South Wales Supreme Court in Australia – attempt to provide parties with a more expeditious and specialised forum for construction litigation. Developments in evidence procedure (particularly in respect of expert evidence) in domestic courts have also improved the efficiency of litigation in construction disputes.

In addition, there has been a growing development of international commercial courts around the world. These courts allow parties to resolve their construction disputes in an international forum, affording the benefits of international commercial arbitration without its perceived concerns regarding legitimacy and absence of appeals.

That said, arbitration nonetheless retains a competitive edge as a means of dispute resolution in the construction industry. The use of international commercial arbitration is widespread and is preferred by parties in construction disputes for its flexibility, enforceability and the expertise of arbitrators, as well as the ability for parties to tailor the arbitration to suit the needs of their dispute.

What impact will technological innovation have on the construction industry over the next five to 10 years?

Technological innovation is a hallmark of the construction industry. It is important that arbitration harnesses the benefits arising out of these innovations to ensure that it remains at the forefront of construction dispute resolution. Technology can play a leading role in streamlining an arbitration and enhancing efficiency and convenience for all parties involved. Although there are many forms of innovation occurring in the construction industry, I will briefly discuss two of them.

First, there has been development of site visualisation technologies, which seek to provide visual perspectives that are alternative or supplementary to the traditional site visit or photographs. While a physical visit may provide the tribunal with the fullest picture of the situation, there are a range of issues that may prevent a visit from occurring – for example, the sizeable costs and inconvenience to be borne by the parties, particularly if the site is in a remote location. Fortunately, technological innovations in this area have largely relieved the necessity for physical site visits. Innovations include time-lapse cameras, video conferencing, presentation software, and computer animations and simulations. Furthermore, the developments in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and augmented and virtual reality, have the capacity to heighten a tribunal’s ability to visualise the dimensions of a project without being physically present.

Secondly, developments in information modelling render high-quality evidence for delay and disruption claims, which are common in construction disputes. Building information modelling (BIM) and system dynamics (SD) modelling are two technological innovations that can greatly improve the efficiency of a construction project. BIM in particular, as a multi-dimensional digital planning method and record of information, has been used in all phases of the project life cycle with great success in the UK, China and the US. Over the next five to 10 years, developments in this area will only serve to improve efficiency in the construction industry.

What are the greatest challenges the construction industry faced with the advent of covid-19?

Like many other industries, the covid-19 pandemic has had an enormous impact on the construction industry worldwide. The effective halt in global travel has affected all aspects of construction projects. Social distancing and isolation requirements have reduced the ability to meet face-to-face and decreased the productivity of workers on construction sites. There are also disruptions to supply chains for building materials and equipment, as imports of overseas manufactured goods are delayed. The effects are passed down the line and will likely be felt for months, if not years, to come and the majority of projects will suffer, if they have not already, extensive delays resulting in ballooning costs. These consequences are exacerbated as construction and infrastructure projects today are more complex and riskier than ever, involving billions of dollars and numerous participants. The globalisation of the construction industry has also amplified the effects of the pandemic.

In what ways has dispute resolution been impacted by the coronavirus pandemic, and how has your practice adapted to these extraordinary times?

The restrictions placed on international travel and the social distancing requirements arising out of the covid-19 pandemic mean that in-person hearings have been severely limited. Needless to say, this has significantly disrupted the traditional approach to dispute resolution. This is particularly the case in international arbitration, where counsel and arbitrators are often from different regions of the world, and thus holding an in-person hearing depends on the ability for international travel.

The current circumstances leave international arbitration participants with only two options: to vacate the hearing dates and wait until travel and in-person gatherings are possible, delaying the proceedings by an unknown period of time; or to embrace virtual hearings as an effective alternative to those in-person. In my practice, I have encouraged parties to adopt the second option where possible. Virtual hearings are of course not without their challenges, including scepticism regarding the examination of witnesses and assessment of their evidence, and concerns surrounding cyber-security and technical failure. However, I have found that these concerns have largely proved unfounded. Many service providers are now technologically able to provide a seamless virtual hearing experience. Furthermore, the proper organisation of a virtual hearing protocol agreed between the parties and tribunal will ensure that the taking of evidence is done efficiently and effectively. Such a protocol may outline matters such as witness sequestration, baseline technical requirements of each participant and security measures.

What do you think the future of dispute resolution looks like in a post-coronavirus world?

I hope that the dispute resolution community will continue to learn from the advantages of conducting virtual hearings and begin to seriously consider it as a viable alternative to in-person hearings when appropriate. The increased familiarity of practitioners with virtual technologies is a large benefit. Even if fully virtual hearings do not enter the mainstream, I believe that there will be a growing use of ‘hybrid’ virtual hearings, in which some participants are physically together and connect with others via video-link. This use of virtual technologies may also benefit other aspects of arbitrations, such as case management conferences and tribunal deliberations. Adding an element of virtuality saves the parties the costs of travel and accommodation and is far more convenient for counsel and the tribunal.

You have enjoyed an extraordinary career to date. What would you like to achieve that you have not yet accomplished?

I do not regard what I have achieved as particularly extraordinary. With focus and enthusiasm, the path I have trodden is one available to all. Every case is a new challenge – to do each well is what I seek to accomplish, as well as continuing to share ideas and contribute to building better mousetraps.

Global Leader

Arbitration 2021

Professional Biography

WWL Ranking: Global Elite Thought Leader

Peers and clients say

"He is very focused, very experienced and very collegial"
"He has great depth of experience and significant analytical skills"
"Doug is energetic, passionate about arbitration and an articulate proponent of the need for adoption of international best practice to enhance procedural efficiencies"
"Doug has the ability to crystallise complex issues in a way that is comprehensible to even those less experienced in the arbitration sphere"

Biography

Professor Doug Jones AO is a leading independent international commercial and investor-state arbitrator. Doug is an arbitrator member at Arbitration Place in Toronto and a door tenant at Atkin Chambers London, and has an office in Sydney. In 2019, he was also appointed as an international judge of the Singapore International Commercial Court.

Prior to his full-time practice as an arbitrator, Doug had 40 years’ experience as an international transactional and disputes projects lawyer.

The arbitrations in which he has been involved include construction, infrastructure, energy, commodities, intellectual property, commercial and joint venture, and investor-state disputes spanning more than 30 jurisdictions around the world, in disputes of values exceeding some billions $US. He has extensive experience as arbitrator under the SIAC, ICC, LCIA, AAA, ICDR, AIAC, KCAB, DIAC, ACICA, Resolution Institute, AMINZ, European Development Fund Arbitration and Conciliation Rules, as well as the ICSID and UNCITRAL Rules. He is the Australian government nominee on the ICSID panel of arbitrators.

Doug is acknowledged as a leading arbitrator and construction practitioner with high rankings in a number of publications. At the 2020 GAR Awards, Doug was named Best Prepared and Most Responsive Arbitrator. Chambers Asia-Pacific has recognised Doug as “without question the leading Asia-Pacific-based arbitrator for construction disputes” and testified that “he is regarded by many as ‘the leading construction arbitrator in the world’”. In 2020, he maintained his band one ranking in the Chambers Asia-Pacific international arbitration category for a 10th consecutive year. In 2018, WWL: UK Bar identified Doug as one of the 10 most highly regarded arbitration practitioners, and an “out-and-out leader of the pack” according to respondents who commend his “excellent mastering of the arbitration rules and practices.” In 2017, Who's Who Legal: Construction commented that Doug is described as “one of the best construction lawyers and arbitrators in the world”. The guide added: “Sources praise him for being ‘unbelievably efficient’ and for his ability to ‘handle the most acrimonious of disputes’.” His substantial contribution to, and leadership in, the Australian legal profession was recognised at the 2014 Lawyers Weekly Law Awards, where he was honoured with the Michael Kirby Lifetime Achievement Award.

Doug has published and presented extensively, and holds professorial appointments at Queen Mary College, University of London; and Melbourne University Law School. A powerful contributor to the knowledge base of international arbitration, he has recently spoken on topics as diverse as costs, expert witnesses and the penalties doctrine.

Doug has held appointments at several international professional associations. Doug is currently serving as the president of the International Academy of Construction Lawyers (IACL) (2018–) and immediate past president of the Australian Centre for International Commercial Arbitration (ACICA) (2008–2014). In 2018 he was chair of the Sydney ICCA Congress. He has served as the chair of the board of trustees and president of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators (CIArb), and was chair of CIArb's centenary celebrations. In 2016, Doug was appointed one of four companions of the CIArb.

Doug was the 2018 recipient of the John Shaw Medal, the road industry's highest accolade, in recognition of his outstanding contribution to road transport in Australia and internationally. In 2012, Doug was made an Officer of the Order of Australia for his distinguished service to the law as a leader in the areas of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, policy reform, and in national and international professional organisations.

Construction 2020

Professional Biography

WWL Ranking: Global Elite Thought Leader

WWL says

Global Elite Thought Leader Doug Jones AO is renowned as a "very impressive arbitrator" who "manages the process with exceptional efficiency".

Biography

Doug Jones AO is a leading independent international commercial and investor-state arbitrator with over 40 years' prior experience as an international transactional and disputes project lawyer. Doug is a door tenant at Atkin Chambers London and an arbitrator member at Arbitration Place in Toronto, and has an office in Sydney. Doug is also an international judge of the Singapore International Commercial Court.

He has been involved in over 120 arbitrations, which include construction, infrastructure, energy, commodities, intellectual property, joint venture, and investor-state disputes spanning more than 30 jurisdictions around the world. He has extensive experience as arbitrator under the ICC, LCIA, AAA, ICDR, KCAB, AIAC (formerly KLRCA), CRCICA, SIAC, VIAC, SCC, DIAC, ACICA, IAMA, AMINZ, European Development Fund Arbitration and Conciliation Rules, as well as the ICSID and UNCITRAL Rules, in disputes of values exceeding some billions of US dollars.

Doug has published and presented extensively and holds professorial appointments at Queen Mary College, University of London; and Melbourne University Law School. Doug has additionally held appointments at professional associations, including serving as the president of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators (CIArb) and the Australian Centre for International Commercial Arbitration (ACICA). He is also the current president of the International Academy of Construction Lawyers (IACL). In 2018, Doug chaired the International Council of Commercial Arbitration (ICCA) Congress held in Sydney.

Doug was made an Officer of the Order of Australia in 2012 for his distinguished service to the law and leadership in arbitration, alternative dispute resolution, policy reform, and national and international professional organisations. In 2018, Doug was awarded the John Shaw Medal in recognition of his lasting contribution to the road transport industry in Australia and internationally.

Government Contracts 2020

Professional Biography

WWL Ranking: Recommended

WWL says

Doug Jones AO is a prominent name who comes highly recommended for his tremendous experience and expertise handling high-value construction, infrastructure and energy disputes.

Biography

Doug Jones AO is a leading independent international commercial and investor-state arbitrator. Doug is an arbitrator member at Arbitration Place in Toronto, and a door tenant at Atkin Chambers in London, UK; and has an office in Sydney, Australia. Doug is also an International Judge of the Singapore International Commercial Court.

Prior to his full-time practice as an arbitrator Doug had 40 years' experience as an international transactional and disputes projects lawyer. 

Doug has been involved in over 130 arbitrations which include construction, infrastructure, energy, commodities, intellectual property, commercial and joint venture, and investor-state disputes spanning over 30 jurisdictions around the world. He has extensive experience as arbitrator under the ICC, LCIA, AAA, ICDR, AIAC (formerly KLRCA), SIAC, VIAC, SCC, DIAC, ACICA, IAMA, KCAB, AMINZ, European Development Fund Arbitration and Conciliation rules, as well as the ICSID and UNCITRAL rules, in disputes of values exceeding some billions US dollars.

Doug is acknowledged as a leading arbitrator by several directories including Chambers Asia-Pacific (where he has held a top-tier ranking for 10 years), WWL and Best Lawyers. He won the 2014 Michael Kirby Lifetime Achievement Award at the Lawyers Weekly Law Awards. Doug was also named Best Prepared and Most Responsive Arbitrator at the GAR Awards in 2020.

Doug holds professorial appointments at Queen Mary College, University of London; and Melbourne University Law School. Doug has held appointments at multiple international professional associations, including the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators (CIArb) where he has served as chair of the board of trustees, president (2011), and chair of CIArb’s centenary celebrations. He is the immediate past president of the Australian Centre for International Commercial Arbitration (2014) and the current president of the International Academy of Construction Lawyers. In 2018, Doug chaired the International Council of Commercial Arbitration Congress held in Sydney.

Mediation 2020

Professional Biography

WWL Ranking: Recommended

WWL says

Douglas Jones AO is "a standout figure in the global market" and is "very highly regarded" for his impeccable experience in construction disputes.

Biography

Doug Jones AO is a leading independent international commercial and investor-state arbitrator with over 40 years' prior experience as an international transactional and disputes project lawyer. Doug is an arbitrator member at Arbitration Place in Toronto and a door tenant at Atkin Chambers London, and has an office in Sydney. Doug is also an international judge of the Singapore International Commercial Court.

He has been involved in over 120 arbitrations, which include construction, infrastructure, energy, commodities, intellectual property, joint venture, and investor-state disputes spanning more than 30 jurisdictions around the world. He has extensive experience as arbitrator under the ICC, LCIA, AAA, ICDR, KCAB, AIAC (formerly KLRCA), CRCICA, SIAC, VIAC, SCC, DIAC, ACICA, IAMA, AMINZ, European Development Fund Arbitration and Conciliation Rules, as well as the ICSID and UNCITRAL Rules, in disputes of values exceeding some billions of US dollars.

Doug has published and presented extensively and holds professorial appointments at Queen Mary College, University of London; and Melbourne University Law School. Doug has additionally held appointments at professional associations, including serving as the president of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators (CIArb) and the Australian Centre for International Commercial Arbitration (ACICA). He is also the current president of the International Academy of Construction Lawyers (IACL). In 2018, Doug chaired the International Council of Commercial Arbitration (ICCA) Congress held in Sydney.

Doug was made an Officer of the Order of Australia in 2012 for his distinguished service to the law and leadership in arbitration, alternative dispute resolution, policy reform, and national and international professional organisations. In 2018, Doug was awarded the John Shaw Medal in recognition of his lasting contribution to the road transport industry in Australia and internationally. At the 2020 GAR Awards, Doug was named Best Prepared and Most Responsive Arbitrator.

National Leader

Australia - Arbitration 2020

Professional Biography

WWL Ranking: Recommended

WWL says

Douglas Jones AO is a long-standing figure with deep and varied experience in investor-state disputes and arbitrations pertaining to infrastructure and construction. 

Biography

Professor Doug Jones AO is a leading independent international commercial and investor-state arbitrator. Doug is an arbitrator member at Arbitration Place in Toronto and a door tenant at Atkin Chambers London, and has an office in Sydney. In  2019, he was also appointed as an international judge of the Singapore International Commercial Court.

Prior to his full-time practice as an arbitrator, Doug had 40 years’ experience as an international transactional and disputes projects lawyer.

The arbitrations in which he has been involved include construction, infrastructure, energy, commodities, intellectual property, commercial and joint venture, and investor-state disputes spanning more than 30 jurisdictions around the world, in disputes of values exceeding some billions $US. He has extensive experience as arbitrator under the SIAC, ICC, LCIA, AAA, ICDR, AIAC, KCAB, DIAC, ACICA, IAMA, AMINZ, European Development Fund Arbitration and Conciliation Rules, as well as the ICSID and UNCITRAL Rules. He is the Australian government nominee on the ICSID panel of arbitrators.

Doug is acknowledged as a leading arbitrator and construction practitioner with high rankings in a number of publications. At the 2020 GAR Awards, Doug was named Best Prepared and Most Responsive Arbitrator. Chambers Asia-Pacific has recognised Doug as “without question the leading Asia-Pacific-based arbitrator for construction disputes” and testified that “he is regarded by many as ‘the leading construction arbitrator in the world’”. In 2020, he maintained his band one ranking in the Chambers Asia-Pacific international arbitration category for a 10th consecutive year. In 2018, WWL: UK Bar identified Doug as one of the 10 most highly regarded arbitration practitioners, and an “out-and-out leader of the pack” according to respondents who commend his “excellent mastering of the arbitration rules and practices.” In 2017, Who's Who Legal: Construction commented that Doug is described as “one of the best construction lawyers and arbitrators in the world”. The guide added: “Sources praise him for being ‘unbelievably efficient’ and for his ability to ‘handle the most acrimonious of disputes’.” His substantial contribution to, and leadership in, the Australian legal profession was recognised at the 2014 Lawyers Weekly Law Awards, where he was honoured with the Michael Kirby Lifetime Achievement Award.

Doug has published and presented extensively, and holds professorial appointments at Queen Mary College, University of London; and Melbourne University Law School. A powerful contributor to the knowledge base of international arbitration, he has recently spoken on topics as diverse as costs, expert witnesses and the penalties doctrine.

Doug has held appointments at several international professional associations. Doug is currently serving as the president of the International Academy of Construction Lawyers (IACL) (2018–) and immediate past president of the Australian Centre for International Commercial Arbitration (ACICA) (2008–2014). In 2018 he was chair of the Sydney ICCA Congress. He has served as the chair of the board of trustees and president of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators (CIArb), and was chair of  CIArb's centenary celebrations. In 2016, Doug was appointed one of four companions of the CIArb.

Doug was the 2018 recipient of  the John Shaw Medal, the road industry's highest accolade, in recognition of his outstanding contribution to road transport in Australia and internationally. In 2012, Doug was made an Officer of the Order of Australia for his distinguished service to the law as a leader in the areas of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, policy reform, and in national and international professional organisations.

Australia - Construction 2020

Professional Biography

WWL Ranking: Recommended

WWL says

Peers say that “living legend” Douglas Jones AO is “internationally regarded” for his deep arbitration experience involving construction and infrastructure issues.

Biography

Doug Jones AO is a leading independent international commercial and investor-state arbitrator with over 40 years' prior experience as an international transactional and disputes project lawyer. Doug is a door tenant at Atkin Chambers London and an arbitrator member at Arbitration Place in Toronto, and has an office in Sydney. Doug is also an international judge of the Singapore International Commercial Court.

He has been involved in over 120 arbitrations, which include construction, infrastructure, energy, commodities, intellectual property, joint venture, and investor-state disputes spanning more than 30 jurisdictions around the world. He has extensive experience as arbitrator under the ICC, LCIA, AAA, ICDR, KCAB, AIAC (formerly KLRCA), CRCICA, SIAC, VIAC, SCC, DIAC, ACICA, IAMA, AMINZ, European Development Fund Arbitration and Conciliation Rules, as well as the ICSID and UNCITRAL Rules, in disputes of values exceeding some billions of US dollars.

Doug has published and presented extensively and holds professorial appointments at Queen Mary College, University of London; and Melbourne University Law School. Doug has additionally held appointments at professional associations, including serving as the president of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators (CIArb) and the Australian Centre for International Commercial Arbitration (ACICA). In 2016, Doug was appointed one of the four Companions of the CIArb. He is also the current president of the International Academy of Construction Lawyers (IACL). In 2018, Doug chaired the International Council of Commercial Arbitration (ICCA) Congress held in Sydney.

Doug was made an Officer of the Order of Australia in 2012 for his distinguished service to the law and leadership in arbitration, alternative dispute resolution, policy reform, and national and international professional organisations. In 2018, Doug was awarded the John Shaw Medal in recognition of his lasting contribution to the road transport industry in Australia and internationally.

WWL Ranking: Recommended
Australia - Mediation 2020

Professional Biography

WWL Ranking: Recommended

WWL says

Doug Jones AO is a well-established figure in the Australian market, credited with profound understanding of alternative dispute resolution proceedings.

Biography

Professor Doug Jones AO is a leading independent international commercial and investor-state arbitrator. Doug is an arbitrator member at Arbitration Place in Toronto and a door tenant at Atkin Chambers London, and has an office in Sydney. Doug is also an international judge of the Singapore International Commercial Court.

Doug has extensive experience as arbitrator under the SIAC, ICC, LCIA, AAA, ICDR, AIAC, KCAB, DIAC, ACICA, IAMA, AMINZ, European Development Fund Arbitration and Conciliation Rules, as well as the ICSID and UNCITRAL Rules. The arbitrations in which he has been involved include construction, infrastructure, energy, commodities, intellectual property, commercial and joint venture, and investor-state disputes spanning more than 30 jurisdictions around the world, in disputes of values exceeding some billions $US.

Doug is ranked in several publications including Chambers Asia-Pacific (band one, 2011–2020); WWL: UK Bar (included in the  “most highly regarded” list  of  arbitrators); and WWL: Construction. At the 2014 Lawyers Weekly Law Awards, he was honoured with the Michael Kirby Lifetime Achievement Award.

Doug holds professorial appointments at Queen Mary College, University of London; and Melbourne University Law School.

Doug is the president of the International Academy of Construction Lawyers (2018–) and the immediate past president of the Australian Centre for International Commercial Arbitration (2008-2014). In 2018 he was chair of the Sydney ICCA Congress. He has  served as chair of the board of trustees, and president, of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators (CIArb), and chaired CIArb's centenary celebrations. In 2016, Doug was appointed one of four companions of CIArb. At the 2020 GAR Awards, Doug was named Best Prepared and Most Responsive Arbitrator.

Doug was the 2018 recipient of  the John Shaw Medal, the road industry's highest accolade, in recognition of his outstanding contribution to road transport in Australia and internationally. In 2012, Doug was made an Officer of the Order of Australia for his distinguished service to the law.

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