Douglas Jones AO
Office:
Level 15, 1 Bligh Street
NSW 2000
City:
Sydney
Country:
Australia
Tel:
+61 2 9353 4120
Fax:
+61 2 8220 6700

Questions and Answers:

Who's Who Legal Thought Leaders Global Elite

Doug Jones AO is a leading independent international commercial and investor-state arbitrator with over 40 years’ experience. The arbitrations in which he has been involved include infrastructure, energy, commodities, intellectual property, commercial and joint venture, and investor-state disputes spanning over 30 jurisdictions around the world. In 2016, Doug was made one of four Companions of the CIArb. He was appointed an Officer of the Order of Australia in 2012.

What attracted you to a career in arbitration?

One particular factor that drew me to international arbitration was the unique opportunity it presented to engage with different legal systems and cultures. In a similar vein, the arbitration community is a legal and business community unlike any other, deriving from a myriad of different backgrounds. Being an arbitrator presents many intellectual and interpersonal challenges, making it a very rewarding pursuit.

You have over 40 years’ experience in dispute resolution. How has the practice changed over time?

I have witnessed many changes to the dispute resolution landscape over my career. However, in recent years it has become clear that increasing global trade has led to a greater number of complex cross-border disputes. These international disputes can involve multiple parties and prolonged commercial relationships requiring a nuanced commercial and legal approach. This will no doubt continue to drive changes in dispute resolution over the coming years.

One of the advantages of arbitration is that parties are able to select their own decision-maker. What do clients look for in an effective panel or sole arbitrator?

Clients will often have their different criteria in selecting an arbitrator but there are several qualities that are almost universally considered to be essential. It goes without saying that the arbitrator must be impartial. Indeed, clients are also seeking someone who is well prepared, responsive and has a deep understanding of the commercial interests of the parties and the arbitral procedure that can best serve those interests. Industry-related specialisation is also often valued and will regularly be essential to provide a sophisticated resolution in international commercial matters.

Market commentators have raised concerns over the increasing number of cases being held privately. What is the impact of this, and to what extent do you share these concerns?

Confidentiality is considered by many to be a hallmark of international commercial arbitration. Despite this, in recent years there has developed debate regarding confidentiality and a strong (and successful) push towards transparency in investor-state arbitration. Some of these issues resonate in the similar, but distinct, field of international commercial arbitration. I have previously noted that greater transparency would assist in the development of law, arbitrator accountability and may be necessary to appropriately ventilate issues concerning the public interest. Yet it must be remembered that confidentiality and transparency are not two distinct concepts, but rather sit on a spectrum. Therefore for me, there must be a balance between protecting the commercial attractiveness of arbitration while facilitating the openness necessary to ensure its ongoing legitimacy.

As an arbitrator, how do you balance counsel’s desire to explore all avenues to secure a win for their client with the need to ensure swift and efficient proceedings?

Achieving a balance between the need for a swift and cost-effective outcome, and the need to ensure that all parties have the opportunity to adequately present their cases, is a challenge. A step too far in either direction can undermine the benefits of arbitration and damage the parties’ confidence in the procedure. Arbitrators should allow appropriate ventilation of each party’s case but also develop proactive case management techniques to encourage counsel to focus on the wood rather than the trees.

What does the future hold for international arbitration? Do you expect its popularity as a means of dispute resolution to continue?

The future for international arbitration is bright. However, its continued success is dependent upon its ability to adapt and innovate in the quest for continuous improvement. With a particular focus on limiting cost and delay, meeting new market demands and further improving enforceability, arbitration will likely continue to flourish as the primary form of international dispute resolution.

What advice would you give to someone looking to practice independently?

I would advise that they develop their knowledge across a breadth of areas and that they seize on every opportunity that presents itself. Engage with others in the arbitration and dispute resolution community, and seek mentors to offer opportunities to grow intellectually and professionally.

Looking back over your career, what do you consider to be your greatest achievement to date?

The mentoring and education of young aspiring practitioners, many of whom have now entered the senior ranks of the profession.

Who's Who Legal Thought Leaders - Arbitration

Doug Jones AO is a leading independent international commercial and investor-state arbitrator. His matters include infrastructure, energy, commodities, commercial and joint venture, and investor-state disputes spanning over 30 jurisdictions around the world. He has extensive experience as an arbitrator under ICC, LCIA, AAA, ICDR, KLRCA, SIAC, DIAC, ACICA, IAMA, AMINZ, European Development Fund Arbitration and Conciliation Rules, as well as the ICSID and UNCITRAL Rules, in disputes of values up to billions of US dollars.

WHAT DO YOU ENJOY MOST ABOUT SITTING AS AN ARBITRATOR?

Firstly, the intellectual and interpersonal challenges regularly presented by the procedural issues leading up to a hearing, which are a major part of the role. Devising ways to assist parties to fairly identify the key issues, and streamline the process, is a key role of a tribunal. Treading this path with the other members of the tribunal can be challenging.  Secondly, the hearing, and finalisation of the award present different opportunities, again stimulating and exciting. In my current role as a full-time arbitrator, I find being able to devote all my efforts to being an arbitrator quite different to juggling the pressures of legal practice with the arbitral role. It is a very privileged position to be in and is most satisfying.

WHAT HAS SURPRISED YOU THE MOST ABOUT HOW ARBITRATION HAS DEVELOPED OVER THE COURSE OF YOUR CAREER?

The blurring of the dichotomy between investor-state and commercial arbitration. We now see the debate about the legitimacy of ISDS presenting challenges to commercial arbitration which were not there before. This is a good thing because the process of commercial arbitration must develop and evolve to meet the needs of users and challenges to the process are needed to keep arbitrators, counsel, and parties on their toes.

WHAT ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT ISSUES TO CONSIDER WHEN ACTING FOR A PARTY IN AN ARBITRATION?

My perspective is now that of an arbitrator, as I no longer do counsel work. Distilling the merits of a party’s case and concentrating upon them is very important. Also, being procedurally civil when provoked and keeping focused on what really matters is difficult but can be extremely effective.

TO WHAT EXTENT ARE EXPERT WITNESSES NOW KEY ELEMENTS OF SUCCESS IN AN ARBITRATION?

Depending on the issues in a case, they can be key; however, the developing requirement for experts to assist the tribunal rather than be mouthpieces for the parties means that their role continues to evolve. “Success” can have two aspects. Winning is one. Here using experts in their evolving role, and letting the experts be truly independent can be a most effective path to winning, albeit a bit of a white-knuckle ride for counsel. A second aspect is efficiency and economy. Here experts, and the tribunal with them, can really help the process by encouraging the early abandonment of extreme, hopeless positions thus assisting parties take realistic views of their prospects, and ensuring that time and effort is devoted to what really is key to the resolution of the issues in contention.

ARBITRATION HAS RECENTLY COME UNDER FIRE DUE TO ISSUES OF TRANSPARENCY AND, IN CERTAIN CASES, FABRICATION OF MATERIALS. WHAT CAN BE DONE TO IMPROVE THE ARBITRAL PROCESS AND STAMP OUT MISCONDUCT?

Although there are some examples of misconduct in my experience, it is much more a theoretical, though much-debated issue. Transparency, however, is a different matter and a very important issue in the maintenance of the continued legitimacy of commercial arbitration, it having now been quite effectively dealt with in the ISDS context. It has a number of aspects including arbitrator performance and avoiding the use of confidentiality by state parties to keep from the public gaze disputes, which, if not transparent, will lead to heavy criticism of the arbitral process, and thus degradation of its legitimacy.

DID YOU ALWAYS EXPECT AND INTEND TO EVENTUALLY BECOME A SOLE PRACTITIONER WHEN YOU WERE PRACTISING AT CLAYTON UTZ?

No. It was a developing possibility as the opportunities for sole practice as an arbitrator developed. Taking the plunge into this new career was not without misgivings. I do miss the transactional side of the practice.

ARE SOME OF THE SIZEABLE CLAIMS BROUGHT IN RECENT YEARS – PARTICULARLY IN GAS PRICING DISPUTES – JUSTIFIED, AND ARE THEY SET TO CONTINUE TO INCREASE?

The fact that disputes of a large magnitude are brought to arbitration is a great vote of confidence in the process. Commercial arbitration must continue to justify the user’s confidence in this respect. Whether amounts claimed are justified is determined by the outcome, but the nature of the deals giving rise to arbitrations are such that the amounts in dispute are sure to continue to rise.

WHAT CAN SEASONED ARBITRATION PRACTITIONERS LEARN FROM THE NEW GENERATION WHO ARE ESTABLISHING THEMSELVES IN THE PROFESSION?

Every day is a learning experience. This is what makes the role so satisfying. Learning from the young enthusiastic practitioners is of great value. New ideas, and infectious energy, are of great value. The key to taking advantage of this is keeping an open mind.

Who's Who Legal Thought Leaders - Construction

Doug Jones AO is a leading independent international commercial and investor-state arbitrator with over 40 years’ prior experience as an international transactional and disputes projects lawyer. Doug has advised extensively on major projects in the areas of project structuring and financing, telecommunications, buildings, transport infrastructure, power, potable and wastewater, mining infrastructure and processing, and on offshore oil and gas. He has significant experience in PPP and PFI projects, and has advised on projects globally.

What do you enjoy most about working in the construction industry?

I have been privileged to be engaged with many critical infrastructure projects over my 40-year career in construction. Working closely with others in pursuit of a common goal in the delivery of these projects has been a source of motivation and satisfaction. Seeing the ongoing use and value of many of the projects which I have been involved with has also been immensely rewarding.

In recent years, in my role as an international arbitrator, I have also enjoyed the intellectual challenges posed by construction disputes. Devising ways to assist parties to fairly identify the key issues, and streamline the process, is a key role of a tribunal and critically important in construction disputes, which are often notorious for their complexity.

What challenges are unique to dispute resolution in the sector?

Construction disputes have many challenging and unique features. This largely stems from the fact that they are often factually and legally intensive, raising a multitude of discrete issues. This results in the presentation of an extensive amount of evidence, a problem which has only been exacerbated in paperless environments.

Thus, construction disputes are well known for their immense volume of documentation, and can also be highly technical, necessitating extensive expert evidence on a variety of technical issues beyond issues of delay and quantum. This means disputes are intellectually challenging but also present unique opportunities to manage evidence to achieve efficient and fair outcomes.

What has been the most memorable case you have worked on over the course of your career so far?

The Taiwan High Speed Rail Project (valued at US$18 billion), now a great commercial success, where I led a team of lawyers acting for the concession company who were resident in Taipei for a number of years. The resolution of disputes during the project, with none remaining at its conclusion, was an outcome of which I am proud.

To what extent is arbitration the preferred method of dispute resolution in the industry?

It is my belief that arbitration is the preferred method of dispute resolution for the construction industry. This is reflected in the number of leading standard form contracts including arbitration agreements and is the result of a number of international arbitration’s key advantages. Although the benefits are many, there are two that I will mention.

The first is the international enforceability of arbitral awards as a result of the New York Convention, which is unparalleled by current laws for the enforcement of foreign judgments. This is a key benefit in the construction industry where participants are often drawn from a range of different jurisdictions, and want a suitably international method of dispute resolution in the event of a dispute.

The second is the ability of the parties to select a decision-maker of their own choosing, such as an arbitrator who specialises in their industry. This allows parties to ensure that their often technical and complex disputes will be heard by someone with the specific expertise capable of providing a sophisticated commercial resolution in international commercial matters.

How has your experience as a mediator affected your approach to arbitration?

The role of an arbitrator is distinct and quite different from that of a mediator. Nevertheless, my time as a mediator has allowed me to develop an appreciation for the commercial interests of disputing parties. This has been of great value in refining my ability to comprehend the complex commercial disputes and interactions that often feature as the subject matter of arbitral disputes.

Construction is a highly technical field requiring expert reports and testimonies. How do you ensure efficient proceedings in the face of large volumes of evidence from each side?

Arbitrators are often in a unique position to unearth the key points in dispute between the parties. To whittle down significant amounts of evidence, the tribunal should engage with the parties on the essential issues at an early stage in the dispute and adopt a flexible and interactive approach to case management that extends beyond Procedural Order No. 1. The tribunal should also carefully manage expert evidence and encourage expert conclaves and joint reports to consider and reconcile differing expert views. By embracing these strategies advocates will be encouraged to focus on the key issues in dispute.

Arbitration has been criticised for, among other things, a perceived lack of transparency and diversity. In your opinion, what should the community’s main priorities be to address these concerns and improve arbitration’s effectiveness as a means of resolving construction disputes?

On the issue of diversity, there is considerable work that needs to be done in promoting gender and cultural diversity in arbitration. The responsibility for change lies with parties, counsel, arbitral institutions, and arbitrators themselves. I am, however, pleased with the positive steps that are being taken, which have in my recent professional experience seen positive changes in diversity with both counsel and arbitrators.

Greater transparency may also improve the effectiveness of international arbitration by encouraging accountability of arbitrators, institutions and counsel, the development of law and public confidence in the process. However, much care needs to be taken to balance the need to safeguard commercially sensitive information while ensuring an appropriate level of openness to protect the legitimacy of arbitration.

What advice would you give to younger lawyers looking to develop specialist expertise in the construction industry?

Obtain as thorough a knowledge of the area as possible and then take every opportunity to practise that presents itself. Seek mentors who will share their experience and provide the opportunity to grow intellectually and professionally.

Biographies:

Who's Who Legal Australia - Arbitration

Professor Doug Jones AO is a leading independent international commercial and investor-state arbitrator. Doug is an arbitrator member at Arbitration Place in Toronto and a door tenant at Atkin Chambers London, and has an office in Sydney.

Prior to his full-time practice as an arbitrator, Doug had 40 years’ experience as an international transactional and disputes projects lawyer.

The arbitrations in which he has been involved include infrastructure, energy, commodities, intellectual property, commercial and joint venture, and investor-state disputes spanning more than 30 jurisdictions around the world. He has extensive experience as arbitrator under the SIAC, ICC, LCIA, AAA, ICDR, AIAC, KCAB, DIAC, ACICA, IAMA, AMINZ, European Development Fund Arbitration and Conciliation Rules, as well as the ICSID and UNCITRAL Rules. In the Asia-Pacific region, he has sat as an arbitrator in Delhi, Hong Kong, Kuala Lumpur, Seoul and Singapore.

Doug is acknowledged as a leading arbitrator and construction practitioner with high rankings in a number of publications. Chambers Asia-Pacific has recognised Doug as “without question the leading Asia-Pacific-based arbitrator for construction disputes” and testified that “he is regarded by many as ‘the leading construction arbitrator in the world’”. In 2018, he maintained his Band One ranking in the Chambers Asia-Pacific international arbitration category for an eighth consecutive year. In the same year, WWL: UK Bar identified Doug as one of the 10 most highly regarded arbitration practitioners, and an “out-and-out leader of the pack” according to respondents who commend his “excellent mastering of the arbitration rules and practices.” In 2017, Who's Who Legal: Construction commented that Doug is described as “one of the best construction lawyers and arbitrators in the world”. The guide added: “Sources praise him for being ‘unbelievably efficient’ and for his ability to ‘handle the most acrimonious of disputes’.” His substantial contribution to, and leadership in, the Australian legal profession was recognised at the 2014 Lawyers Weekly Law Awards, where he was honoured with the Michael Kirby Lifetime Achievement Award.

Doug has published and presented extensively, and holds professorial appointments at Queen Mary College, University of London and Melbourne University Law School. A powerful contributor to the knowledge base of international arbitration, he has recently spoken on topics as diverse as costs, the penalties doctrine, and the powers and duties of arbitrators.

Doug has held appointments at several international professional associations. Doug is currently serving as the president of the International Academy of Construction Lawyers (IACL) (2018-date) and immediate past president of the Australian Centre for International Commercial Arbitration (ACICA) (2008-2014). In 2018 he was chair of the Sydney ICCA Congress. He has served as the chair of the board of trustees and president of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators (CIArb), and was chair of CIArb's centenary celebrations. In 2016, Doug was appointed one of four companions of the CIArb.

In 2012, Doug was made an Officer of the Order of Australia for his distinguished service to the law as a leader in the areas of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, policy reform, and in national and international professional organisations.

WWL says: Douglas Jones AO “really stands out” in the market as “a very well-known international arbitrator and a specialist in construction disputes.”

This biography is an extract from Who's Who Legal: Australia which can be purchased from our Shop.

Who's Who Legal Arbitration: Lawyers

Doug Jones AO is a leading independent international commercial and investor-state arbitrator with over 40 years' prior experience as an international transactional and disputes project lawyer. Doug is an arbitrator member at Arbitration Place in Toronto, a door tenant at Atkin Chambers London and has an office in Sydney.

He has been involved in over 100 arbitrations which include construction, infrastructure, energy, commodities, intellectual property, joint venture, and investor-state disputes spanning over 30 jurisdictions. He has extensive experience as arbitrator under the ICC, LCIA, AAA, ICDR, KCAB, AIAC (formerly KLRCA), SIAC, DIAC, ACICA, Resolution Institute, AMINZ, European Development Fund Arbitration and Conciliation Rules, as well as the ICSID and UNCITRAL Rules, in disputes of values exceeding some billions US dollars.

Doug has published and presented extensively and holds professorial appointments at Queen Mary College, University of London; and Melbourne University Law School.

Doug has held appointments at several international professional associations. He has served as the chair of the board of trustees and president of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators (CIArb) and was chair of CIArb's centenary celebrations. In 2016, Doug was appointed one of the four living companions of CIArb. Doug also chaired the 2018 International Council of Commercial Arbitration (ICCA) Congress held in Sydney. He is serving as the immediate past president of the Australian Centre for International Commercial Arbitration (ACICA).

He was awarded an Officer of the Order of Australia in 2012 in the Queen's Birthday Honours List for his distinguished service to the law and leadership in arbitration, alternative dispute resolution, policy reform, and national and international professional organisations.

WWL says: Doug Jones AO is "one of the best arbitrators in the market" with "great experience", and is a "leader in international arbitration in Australia".

This biography is an extract from Who's Who Legal: Arbitration which can be purchased from our Shop.

Who's Who Legal Australia - Construction

Professor Doug Jones AO is a leading independent international commercial and investor-state arbitrator. Doug is an arbitrator member at Arbitration Place in Toronto and a door tenant at Atkin Chambers London, and has an office in Sydney.

Prior to his full-time practice as an arbitrator, Doug had 40 years’ experience as an international transactional and disputes projects lawyer.

The arbitrations in which he has been involved include infrastructure, energy, commodities, intellectual property, commercial and joint venture, and investor-state disputes spanning more than 30 jurisdictions around the world. He has extensive experience as arbitrator under the SIAC, ICC, LCIA, AAA, ICDR, AIAC, KCAB, DIAC, ACICA, IAMA, AMINZ, European Development Fund Arbitration and Conciliation Rules, as well as the ICSID and UNCITRAL Rules. In the Asia-Pacific region, he has sat as an arbitrator in Delhi, Hong Kong, Kuala Lumpur, Seoul and Singapore.

Doug is acknowledged as a leading arbitrator and construction practitioner with high rankings in a number of publications. Chambers Asia-Pacific has recognised Doug as “without question the leading Asia-Pacific-based arbitrator for construction disputes” and testified that “he is regarded by many as ‘the leading construction arbitrator in the world’”. In 2018, he maintained his Band One ranking in the Chambers Asia-Pacific international arbitration category for an eighth consecutive year. In the same year, WWL: UK Bar identified Doug as one of the 10 most highly regarded arbitration practitioners, and an “out-and-out leader of the pack” according to respondents who commend his “excellent mastering of the arbitration rules and practices.” In 2017, WWL: Construction commented that Doug is described as “one of the best construction lawyers and arbitrators in the world”. The guide added: “Sources praise him for being ‘unbelievably efficient’ and for his ability to ‘handle the most acrimonious of disputes’.” His substantial contribution to, and leadership in, the Australian legal profession was recognised at the 2014 Lawyers Weekly Law Awards, where he was honoured with the Michael Kirby Lifetime Achievement Award.

Doug has published and presented extensively, and holds professorial appointments at Queen Mary College, University of London and Melbourne University Law School. A powerful contributor to the knowledge base of international arbitration, he has recently spoken on topics as diverse as costs, the penalties doctrine, and the powers and duties of arbitrators.

Doug has held appointments at several international professional associations. Doug is currently serving as the president of the International Academy of Construction Lawyers (IACL) (2018-date) and immediate past president of the Australian Centre for International Commercial Arbitration (ACICA) (2008-2014). In 2018 he was chair of the Sydney ICCA Congress. He has served as the chair of the board of trustees and president of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators (CIArb), and was chair of CIArb's centenary celebrations. In 2016, Doug was appointed one of four companions of the CIArb.

In 2012, Doug was made an Officer of the Order of Australia for his distinguished service to the law as a leader in the areas of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, policy reform, and in national and international professional organisations.

WWL says: Douglas Jones AO is a leading figure in the Australian market. Peers say, “He is one of the best construction arbitration lawyers around” and speak highly of his “vast international experience”.

This biography is an extract from Who's Who Legal: Australia which can be purchased from our Shop.

Who's Who Legal Construction: Lawyers

Doug Jones AO is a leading independent international commercial and investor-state arbitrator. Doug is an arbitrator member at Arbitration Place in Toronto, a door tenant at Atkin Chambers London, UK and has an office in Sydney, Australia.

Prior to his full-time practice as an arbitrator Doug had 40 years' experience as an international transactional and disputes projects lawyer.

The arbitrations in which he has been involved include infrastructure, energy, commodities, intellectual property, commercial and joint venture, and investor-state disputes spanning over 30 jurisdictions around the world. He has extensive experience as arbitrator under the ICC, LCIA, AAA, ICDR, KLRCA, SIAC, DIAC, ACICA, IAMA, KCAB, AMINZ, European Development Fund Arbitration and Conciliation rules, as well as the ICSID and UNCITRAL rules, in disputes of values up to some billion US dollars.

Doug is acknowledged as a leading arbitrator and is highly ranked in a number of leading publications. Chambers Asia-Pacific has recognised Doug as "without question the leading Asia-Pacific-based arbitrator for construction disputes" and testified that "he is regarded by many as "'the leading construction arbitrator in the world'". In 2018, he maintained his Band 1 ranking in the Chambers Asia-Pacific international arbitration category for an eighth consecutive year. In 2017, Who's Who Legal praised Doug as "one of the best construction lawyers and arbitrators in the world" as he is "unbelievably efficient" and for his ability to "handle the most acrimonious of disputes". His earlier achievements include being ranked in the list of 15 "most highly regarded individuals" in the global construction law category by Who's Who Legal in 2015, and being named Lawyer of the Year for international arbitration in Sydney by Best Lawyers (2015–2017). His substantial contributions and leadership in the Australian legal profession was recognised when he was honoured with the Michael Kirby Lifetime Achievement Award at the 2014 Lawyers Weekly Law Awards.

Doug has published and spoken extensively and holds professorial appointments at Queen Mary College, University of London and Melbourne University law school.

Doug has held appointments to multiple international professional associations, including serving as the chair of the board of trustees, president (2011) and chair of the centenary celebrations of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators (CIArb). He is the incoming president of the International Academy of Construction Lawyers.

In 2016, Doug was made one of four companions of the CIArb. He was awarded an Officer of the Order of Australia in 2012 in the Queen's Birthday Honours List for his distinguished service to the law and leadership in arbitration, alternative dispute resolution, policy reform, and national and international professional organisations.

WWL says: Douglas Jones AO is one of the leading international arbitrators in the market today who, according to sources, "has vast experience and understands the key issues immediately” when it comes to complex construction disputes.

This biography is an extract from Who's Who Legal: Construction which can be purchased from our Shop.

Who's Who Legal Australia - Government Contracts

Professor Doug Jones AO is a leading independent international commercial and investor-state arbitrator. Doug is an arbitrator member at Arbitration Place in Toronto and a door tenant at Atkin Chambers London, and has an office in Sydney.

Prior to his full-time practice as an arbitrator, Doug had 40 years’ experience as an international transactional and disputes projects lawyer.

The arbitrations in which he has been involved include infrastructure, energy, commodities, intellectual property, commercial and joint venture, and investor-state disputes spanning more than 30 jurisdictions around the world. He has extensive experience as arbitrator under the SIAC, ICC, LCIA, AAA, ICDR, AIAC, KCAB, DIAC, ACICA, IAMA, AMINZ, European Development Fund Arbitration and Conciliation Rules, as well as the ICSID and UNCITRAL Rules. In the Asia-Pacific region, he has sat as an arbitrator in Delhi, Hong Kong, Kuala Lumpur, Seoul and Singapore.

Doug is acknowledged as a leading arbitrator and construction practitioner with high rankings in a number of publications. Chambers Asia-Pacific has recognised Doug as “without question the leading Asia-Pacific-based arbitrator for construction disputes” and testified that “he is regarded by many as ‘the leading construction arbitrator in the world’”. In 2018, he maintained his Band One ranking in the Chambers Asia-Pacific international arbitration category for an eighth consecutive year. In the same year, WWL: UK Bar identified Doug as one of the 10 most highly regarded arbitration practitioners, and an “out-and-out leader of the pack” according to respondents who commend his “excellent mastering of the arbitration rules and practices.” In 2017, Who's Who Legal: Construction commented that Doug is described as “one of the best construction lawyers and arbitrators in the world”. The guide added: “Sources praise him for being ‘unbelievably efficient’ and for his ability to ‘handle the most acrimonious of disputes’.” His substantial contribution to, and leadership in, the Australian legal profession was recognised at the 2014 Lawyers Weekly Law Awards, where he was honoured with the Michael Kirby Lifetime Achievement Award.

Doug has published and presented extensively, and holds professorial appointments at Queen Mary College, University of London and Melbourne University Law School. A powerful contributor to the knowledge base of international arbitration, he has recently spoken on topics as diverse as costs, the penalties doctrine, and the powers and duties of arbitrators.

Doug has held appointments at several international professional associations. Doug is currently serving as the president of the International Academy of Construction Lawyers (IACL) (2018-date) and immediate past president of the Australian Centre for International Commercial Arbitration (ACICA) (2008-2014). In 2018 he was chair of the Sydney ICCA Congress. He has served as the chair of the board of trustees and president of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators (CIArb), and was chair of CIArb's centenary celebrations. In 2016, Doug was appointed one of four Companions of the CIArb.

In 2012, Doug was made an Officer of the Order of Australia for his distinguished service to the law as a leader in the areas of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, policy reform, and in national and international professional organisations.

WWL says: Douglas Jones is an excellent practitioner with a top-tier reputation both domestically and abroad thanks to his great expertise in infrastructure and joint-venture matters.

This biography is an extract from Who's Who Legal: Australia which can be purchased from our Shop.

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