Marcel A G Reurs
Office:
IJdok 23
1013 MM
City:
Amsterdam
Country:
Netherlands
Tel:
+31 20 752 32 16
Fax:
+31 20 752 23 01

Questions and Answers:

Who's Who Legal Thought Leaders Global Elite

Marcel A G Reurs has been practising Dutch and EU immigration law for over 22 years. His broad practice includes the full range of business immigration work for corporate clients across the globe. Annually listed in WWL, the guide now ranks him among the 10 most influential immigration attorneys in Europe.

What motivated you to pursue a career in corporate immigration law?

A very inspiring university professor who was also an inspiring immigration lawyer got me interested in taking immigration law as an optional course. I started at the immigration law firm Everaert. A few years after my admission, the firm’s practice began to shift towards corporate immigration and I became more and more involved in the corporate work. In the corporate practice, I was immediately caught by the interaction between immigration law and other areas, such as employment law, corporate law and tax law. In recent years, I have developed a particular interest in the immigration aspects of mergers and acquisitions and other corporate restructuring.

Which industry sectors do you perceive to be most active in the space of corporate immigration at present?

Information technology and finance.

The Dutch economy is performing well at the moment. How are you seeing this affect the volume of work you have received?

Due to the considerable growth of the Dutch economy, we have seen an increase in the demand for labour in almost all sectors, resulting in an increase of application work – notably in sectors requiring highly skilled workers such as IT and finance. We have also seen an increase in project-based application work, such as work permits or project certifications in connection with the delivery of goods and services.

How do you expect the proposed revisions to the European Blue Card directive to impact your clients?

The adoption of proposal 2016/0176 (COD) will change the European corporate immigration landscape fundamentally as it aims to harmonise highly skilled employment by not allowing the member states to continue any national parallel schemes. For intra-company transfers, this arrangement has already been in place since 2016. This means that, if this directive is adopted, the EU shall, for the first time in its history, have succeeded in harmonising the conditions for highly skilled employment-based immigration. From a client perspective, the proposal offers little advantage for employers, compared to our national parallel scheme, the highly skilled migrant programme. The most notable advantages of the proposal are that it offers short-term mobility, enabling EBC (European Blue Card) holders to carry out business activities in other member states without a work permit; and long-term mobility, allowing EBC holders to apply for a Blue Card in another member state after 12 months (rather than the current 18). Another advantage is that the proposal defines the notion of a “business trip” and lists the activities that must be accepted in all member states as permissible for a Blue Card holder. This will likely not end, but may limit the uncertainty surrounding permissible activities during business visits that currently exists. For the employee, the main benefit is eligibility for permanent residence under Directive 2003/109 after three years, rather than five years.

How has technology shaped the field of immigration law since you started practising?

It continues to amaze me how fundamentally our lives have changed, both professionally and personally, due to the advancing technology. When I started in 1996, we had landline telephones (not mobiles) faxes and paper files, and I was filling my days dictating letters to be typed out by a secretary. Now, practically all communication is digital. Even immigration applications and court appeals are filed online. In the field of immigration law specifically, technology has shaped our practice in almost every way. To start with, most of our high-volume clients are IT companies that need to post workers in Europe for installing software. Next, technology offers all our clients great efficiency benefits, using their or our immigration trackers and HR database storing systems. But it also offers new challenges for our clients, such as GDPR compliance, and I believe we must remain observant and critical about the use of technology for immigration enforcement, such as collecting and using biometric data and social media vetting.

What do clients look for in an effective corporate immigration lawyer?

One who can put a solution in place, quickly.

What is your proudest achievement to date?

My proudest achievement, which I share with my close co-workers Bram van Melle and Kirsty Gies, is that we have been successful in building a close-knit team that is committed to and striving for excellence in our corporate practice.

Who's Who Legal Thought Leaders - Corporate Immigration

Marcel AG Reurs has been practising Dutch and EU immigration law for over 22 years. His broad practice includes the full range of business immigration work for corporate clients across the globe. Annually listed in WWL, the guide now ranks him among the 10 most influential immigration attorneys in Europe.

What motivated you to pursue a career in corporate immigration law?

A very inspiring university professor who was also an inspiring immigration lawyer got me interested in taking immigration law as an optional course. I started at the immigration law firm Everaert. A few years after my admission, the firm’s practice began to shift towards corporate immigration and I became more and more involved in the corporate work. In the corporate practice, I was immediately caught by the interaction between immigration law and other areas, such as employment law, corporate law and tax law. In recent years, I have developed a particular interest in the immigration aspects of mergers and acquisitions and other corporate restructurings.

Which industry sectors do you perceive to be most active in the space of corporate immigration at present?

Information technology and finance.

The Dutch economy is performing well at the moment. How are you seeing this affect the volume of work you have received?

Due to the considerable growth of the Dutch economy, we have seen an increase in the demand for labour in almost all sectors, resulting in an increase of application work – notably in sectors requiring highly skilled workers such as IT and finance. We have also seen an increase in project-based application work, such as work permits or project certifications in connection with the delivery of goods and services.

How do you expect the proposed revisions to the European Blue Card directive to impact your clients?

The adoption of proposal 2016/0176 (COD) will change the European corporate immigration landscape fundamentally as it aims to harmonise highly skilled employment by not allowing the member states to continue any national parallel schemes. For intra-company transfers, this arrangement has already been in place since 2016. This means that, if this directive is adopted, the EU shall, for the first time in its history, have succeeded in harmonising the conditions for highly skilled employment-based immigration. From a client perspective, the proposal offers little advantage for employers, compared to our national parallel scheme, the highly skilled migrant programme. The most notable advantages of the proposal are that it offers short-term mobility, enabling EBC (European Blue Card) holders to carry out business activities in other member states without a work permit; and long-term mobility, allowing EBC holders to apply for a Blue Card in another member state after 12 months (rather than the current 18). Another advantage is that the proposal defines the notion of a “business trip” and lists the activities that must be accepted in all member states as permissible for a Blue Card holder. This will likely not end, but may limit the uncertainty surrounding permissible activities during business visits that currently exists. For the employee, the main benefit is eligibility for permanent residence under Directive 2003/109 after three years, rather than five years.

How has technology shaped the field of immigration law since you started practising?

It continues to amaze me how fundamentally our lives have changed, both professionally and personally, due to the advancing technology. When I started in 1996, we had landline telephones (not mobiles) faxes and paper files, and I was filling my days dictating letters to be typed out by a secretary. Now, practically all communication is digital. Even immigration applications and court appeals are filed online. In the field of immigration law specifically, technology has shaped our practice in almost every way. To start with, most of our high-volume clients are IT companies that need to post workers in Europe for installing software. Next, technology offers all our clients great efficiency benefits, using their or our immigration trackers and HR database storing systems. But it also offers new challenges for our clients, such as GDPR compliance, and I believe we must remain observant and critical about the use of technology for immigration enforcement, such as collecting and using biometric data and social media vetting.

What do clients look for in an effective corporate immigration lawyer?

One who can put a solution in place, quickly.

What is your proudest achievement to date?

My proudest achievement, which I share with my close co-workers Bram van Melle and Kirsty Gies, is that we have been successful in building a close-knit team that is committed to and striving for excellence in our corporate practice.

Biography:

Who's Who Legal Corporate Immigration

Marcel is a partner and co-head of the firm’s corporate immigration practice. He brings over 22 years’ experience across all immigration routes with a particular emphasis on employment-related and business-related categories, including but not limited to highly-skilled migrant, intra-corporate transfer, European Blue Card and the self-employed and investor categories. He has significant experience in handling immigration aspects of mergers and acquisitions and other corporate restructuring, compliance with sponsor duties and cross-border service provision involving the posting of workers with customers in the EU.

Marcel’s clients range from long-established international companies across the globe in need of high-volume application work to start-up companies and entrepreneur-investors.

Marcel is a contributing co-editor to the leading commentary on the Dutch Immigration Act, editor-in-chief and case annotator to the Journal on Immigration Law and chief of the editorial board of Jurisprudence on Immigration Law, the Dutch immigration jurisprudence series. He has developed the Dutch Bar Association’s course on immigration law for trainee attorneys and served the Ministry of Justice as an expert adviser in the immigration policy reform, Modern Migration Policies. Marcel regularly speaks at national and international conferences

Marcel has been a partner since 2002 and is the current executive chair of the firm’s board. He is an active member of the International Bar Association and an active international associate with the American Immigration Lawyers Association, where he is the current chair of the Global Migration Section’s analytics committee. He is a member of the Dutch specialist associations for immigration attorneys, SVMA and WRV.

WWL says: Marcel Reurs is a prominent figure in the market who is "excellent" in all matters relating to Dutch immigration.

This biography is an extract from Who's Who Legal: Corporate Immigration which can be purchased from our Shop.

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